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Haskell blew my mind yet again when I realised that

(x,y)

Is just syntactic sugar for

(,) x y

Naturally I wanted to extend this to larger tuples. But

(,) x ((,) y z)

Gave me

(x,(y,z))

Which was not what I was looking for. On a whim, I tried

(,,) x y z

And it worked, giving exactly what I wanted:

(x,y,z)

This raised the question: How far can you take it? Much to my astonishment, there seemed to be no limit. All of the below are valid operators:

(,)
(,,)
(,,,)
(,,,,)
--etc
(,,,,,,,,,,,,,,)
(,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,)
--etc
(,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,)
--etc

This behaviour is amazing and leads to my actual question: Is it something which can be emulated in my own functions? Or is it just a GHC-specific feature of the tuple operator? I'm thinking it's the latter as I've read the haskell98 specification and iirc it says that implementations only have to define the tuple operator for up to 15 items. Whereas GHC has gone the whole hog and let you do it up to arbitrary limits.

So, would it be possible to define this family of operators/functions from within the haskell implementation itself, using nothing but the type system and existing language features (declarations, type signatures, function definitions etc.)? And if so, how? Or is it impossible and you have to instead look into the compiler to find the supporting framework for this collection of functions?

This leads to an even more general question: How much of Haskell is supported by Haskell itself, through type and function definitions, declarations etc; and how much is supported by the compiler/implementation? (I am aware that GHC was written in Haskell, that doesn't answer the question)

That is, if you were to abandon the standard libraries (including the prelude) and do everything from the ground up in raw Haskell; would it be possible to build a complete implementation that has all the features of GHC, using only that minimal set of features? What are the mimimum set of language features that you need in order to build a haskell implementation using Haskell? Would I be able to abandon the prelude and then completely rebuild it manually from within GHC? If you abandon the prelude and never import anything, what is left over for you to work with?

It may seem like I'm asking a million questions, but they're really all trying to ask the same thing with different wording. Give it your best shot SO!

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1  
Just about everything except numeric types (Int, Double, etc) can be defined in Haskell itself, but not always with the same syntax. –  augustss Aug 17 '11 at 10:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Alas, there is no magic in the tuples. Here's the implementation GHC uses, and to give you some idea of what's going on here's the source for the last definition:

data (,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,) a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z a_ b_ c_ d_ e_ f_ g_ h_ i_ j_ k_ l_ m_ n_ o_ p_ q_ r_ s_ t_ u_ v_ w_ x_ y_ z_ a__ b__ c__ d__ e__ f__ g__ h__ i__ j__
  = (,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,) a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z a_ b_ c_ d_ e_ f_ g_ h_ i_ j_ k_ l_ m_ n_ o_ p_ q_ r_ s_ t_ u_ v_ w_ x_ y_ z_ a__ b__ c__ d__ e__ f__ g__ h__ i__ j__

...yeah.

So, would it be possible to define this family of operators/functions from within the haskell implementation itself, using nothing but the type system and existing language features (declarations, type signatures, function definitions etc.)? And if so, how? Or is it impossible and you have to instead look into the compiler to find the supporting framework for this collection of functions?

No, there's no way to define the tuples like that in a generic way. The common pattern is purely syntactic, nothing that can be done recursively in the type system or otherwise. You could generate such definitions using Template Haskell, certainly, but you'd still be generating each individually with string manipulation to create the name, not using any sort of shared structure.

There's also the matter that tuple syntax is built-in and not something that can be imitated, but that's a separate issue. You might imagine types like:

data Tuple2 a b = Tuple2 a b
data Tuple3 a b c = Tuple3 a b c

...etc., which don't use special syntax but still can't be defined generically for the reasons above.

This leads to an even more general question: How much of Haskell is supported by Haskell itself, through type and function definitions, declarations etc; and how much is supported by the compiler/implementation? (I am aware that GHC was written in Haskell, that doesn't answer the question)

Almost all of it is defined in Haskell. Certain things have special syntax you can't imitate, but in most cases that only extends as far as the compiler giving special attention to certain definitions. Otherwise, there's no difference between this:

data [] a = [] | a : [a]

...and any equivalent type you define yourself.

That is, if you were to abandon the standard libraries (including the prelude) and do everything from the ground up in raw Haskell; would it be possible to build a complete implementation that has all the features of GHC, using only that minimal set of features? What are the mimimum set of language features that you need in order to build a haskell implementation using Haskell? Would I be able to abandon the prelude and then completely rebuild it manually from within GHC? If you abandon the prelude and never import anything, what is left over for you to work with?

You may find it enlightening to read about GHC's NoImplicitPrelude and RebindableSyntax extensions, which let you, among other things, change the definitions used to interpret do notation, how numeric literals are handled, what the if then else syntax does, etc.

Suffice it to say that very, very little can't be reimplemented. Most things that can't are only special due to syntax, and could be replaced with equivalent stuff (like lists and tuples, above).

In the end there's a limited set of things that have very special behavior--the IO type being an obvious example--that you can't replace at all, because they're hooked directly into something in the runtime system that you can't replace.

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Great response, only thing I'm still confused about is the final definition of the tuple constructor. If you go to ghci and ask for the type of a tuple constructor that is double the size of the last one defined, ghci does not complain and gives back the appropriate signature. ghci doesn't seem to be obeying it's own definitions. (Or the person who wrote that page got bored of doing the same thing over and over again :p) –  TheIronKnuckle Aug 17 '11 at 0:53
1  
@TheIronKnuckle: I think that's due to the syntax being built in. If I try to actually use a larger tuple, I get an error saying that GHCi's linker can't find the symbol. Keep in mind that GHCi actually loads a lot of stuff only on demand. –  C. A. McCann Aug 17 '11 at 0:56
    
Though you can get structures which, while not technically tuples, are as good as tuples in that they can store heterogeneous data: data Tup a b = Nil | Pair a b. Is there anything you can do with a tuple that you can't do with that? –  Owen Aug 17 '11 at 0:58
1  
@Owen: Not introduce more indirections, for one thing. (a,b,c) has one indirection, then all three values; Tup a (Tup b c) has one indirection for each Tup constructor. Note that a layer of indirection here means another place where something can be _|_ or an unevaluated thunk. –  C. A. McCann Aug 17 '11 at 1:14
4  
A more faithful choice would be data Tup a b = Tup a !b, and then type Pair a b = Tup a (Tup b ()); type Triple a b c = Tup a (Tup b (Tup c ())) If you can also get the compiler to unpack the strict b in Tup then the representation would be like tuples. –  augustss Aug 17 '11 at 10:48

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