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function t()
{
    var x = 1;
    if(true)
    {
        var x = 2;
        alert(x);
    }
    alert(x);
}
t();

Anyone knows the reason?

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marked as duplicate by Mike Samuel, Idolon, Frank N. Stein, Marijn, Robby Pond Mar 22 '14 at 14:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
welcome to javascript :) –  Jackson Aug 17 '11 at 1:47

3 Answers 3

Because JavaScript (well ECMAScript) does not have block scope (yet). Just function scope.

There's really just one variable declaration that is hoisted to the top of the function, so x=2 is overwriting the initial value of 1.

function t()
{
    var x = 1;

       // v---------immediately invoked function to create a new scope
    (function() {
          // new variable scope
        if(true)
        {
            var x = 2;
            alert(x); // 2
        }
    })();

    alert(x); // 1
}
t();
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Not a very optimistic "yet". I doubt this will ever change. Imagine the nightmare of breaking decades(?) of code. EDIT: I stand corrected, your edited link provides some additional insight I did not consider. –  Anthony Sottile Aug 17 '11 at 1:41
1  
@Anthony: If your code is running in the browser, then very true. Out of the browser in free-standing JS engines, there's reason to be optimistic (or even to enjoy it today). :o) –  user113716 Aug 17 '11 at 1:44

The 'var' keyword applies within a whole function, so the code you have will behave identically to this:

function t() {
    var x = 1;
    if (true) {
        x = 2;
        alert(x);
    }
    alert(x);
}
t();
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Variables in Javascript are scoped to the function, not to blocks. You've got two vars, but there's really only one x.

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