Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

For example suppose I have the following

  var lastSecurity = ""

  def allSecurities = for {
    security <- lastTrade.keySet.toList
    lastSecurity = security
  } yield security

At the moment

lastSecurity = security

Seems to be creating a new variable in scope rather than modifying the variable declared in the first line of code.

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Try this:

var lastSecurity = ""

def allSecurities = for {
  security <- lastTrade.keySet.toList
} yield {
  lastSecurity = security
  security
}
share|improve this answer

It's just like

var a = 1
{
  var a = 2
  println(a)
}
println(a)

which prints

2
1

It doesn't matter whether these are vars or vals. In Scala you're allowed to shadow variables from the outer scope, but this might lead to some confusion when you're exscused having to use the val keyword, i.e. for-comprehensions, anonymous functions and pattern matching.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.