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I always deal with data files that consist of many data blocks of the following format:

*name* attr (
        VALID (
                late_lead_up xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
                late_lead_dn xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
                early_trail_up xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
                early_trail_dn xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
              )
        CEXT xxx
        CREF xxx
        REFF xxx
        QUALIFIED_CLOCK
)

Is there anyway I can extract the "name" that I interested in using a one-liner from the command line?

share|improve this question
    
Do you know how many lines the block is? –  lc. Apr 2 '09 at 8:15
    
the number of line is not fixed –  zh_ Apr 2 '09 at 8:21
    
do name and its closing parenthese appear at the beginning of the line? Does anything else appear at the beginning of the line? –  Nathan Fellman Apr 2 '09 at 8:23
    
no name and closing parenthese are in ^ position –  zh_ Apr 2 '09 at 8:41
    
See my update for a perl solution which takes into account the "QUALIFIED_CLOCK" requirement - not the most readable one-liner, though it can be turned into a script. –  paxdiablo Apr 2 '09 at 9:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using this file for demo purposes:

of_interest attr (
    1:VALID (
        1:late_lead_up xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        1:late_lead_dn xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        1:early_trail_up xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        1:early_trail_dn xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
    1:)
    1:CEXT xxx
    1:CREF xxx
    1:REFF xxx
    1:QUALIFIED_CLOCK
)

boring attr (
    2:VALID (
        2:late_lead_up xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        2:late_lead_dn xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        2:early_trail_up xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        2:early_trail_dn xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
    2:)
    2:CEXT xxx
    2:CREF xxx
    2:REFF xxx
    2:QUALIFIED_CLOCK
)

of_interest attr (
    3:VALID (
        3:late_lead_up xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        3:late_lead_dn xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        3:early_trail_up xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        3:early_trail_dn xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
    3:)
    3:CEXT xxx
    3:CREF xxx
    3:REFF xxx
    3:QUALIFIED_CLOCK
)

This one-liner (split for readability):

awk '
    BEGIN               {s=0}
    /^of_interest /     {s=1}
    /^)$/               {if (s==1) {print};s=0}
                        {if (s==1) print}'

or the minimum character version:

awk 'BEGIN{s=0}/^of_interest /{s=1}/^)$/{if(s==1){print};s=0}{if(s==1)print}'

gives you:

of_interest attr (
    1:VALID (
        1:late_lead_up xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        1:late_lead_dn xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        1:early_trail_up xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        1:early_trail_dn xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
    1:)
    1:CEXT xxx
    1:CREF xxx
    1:REFF xxx
    1:QUALIFIED_CLOCK
)
of_interest attr (
    3:VALID (
        3:late_lead_up xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        3:late_lead_dn xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        3:early_trail_up xxx af uclk reff xxx slope xxx
        3:early_trail_dn xxx ar uclk reff xxx slope xxx
    3:)
    3:CEXT xxx
    3:CREF xxx
    3:REFF xxx
    3:QUALIFIED_CLOCK
)

which I believe is what you were after.

It's basically a simple state machine that turns on printing when it finds the desired block start and turns it off when it finds the end of that block.

UPDATE: Here's a perl one-liner that takes care of your qualified_clock requirement. Enjoy :-)

perl -e '$s=1;while(<STDIN>){if(/^of_interest /){$s=1;$f=0;$x="";}if(($s==1)&&/QUALIFIED_CLOCK/){$f=1;}if(/^\)$/){if($s==1){$x.=$_;}if($f==1){print$x;}$s=0;next;}if($s==1){$x.=$_;}}'
share|improve this answer
    
what if some data block has QUALIFIED_CLOCK and some don't have, and i would like to extract all blocks with QUALIFIED_CLOCK? –  zh_ Apr 2 '09 at 8:37
    
Then you would need to store the lines rather than print them, clear a flag when starting the block, set it if you find QUALIFIED_CLOCK and, when you find the block end, output all the lines if the flag is set. –  paxdiablo Apr 2 '09 at 8:44
    
If there are going to be more requirements changes, I'd opt to move to a Python/Perl-based solution, but it won't be a readable one-liner in any language :-) –  paxdiablo Apr 2 '09 at 8:45
    
thanks, i will try to code it. –  zh_ Apr 2 '09 at 8:48

Far less characters and simpler solution than Pax's one

perl -ne '/^of_interest /../^\)/ and print'

or

awk '/^of_interest /,/^\)/{print}'

or

sed -n '/^of_interest /,/^)/p'
share|improve this answer

If your block always start with '*name* attr (' and always ends with a ')' alone with no leading space, you can try (given that foo is the block name and data.txt is the file to parse):

awk '/ attr \($/ {if($1==n)b=1}  {if(b)print}  /^\)$/ {b=0}' n=foo data.txt
share|improve this answer

Well, you tagged it Perl, so here is how I would do it in Perl:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

die "usage: $0 name datafile\n    or cat datafile | $0 name\n" 
    unless @ARGV > 0;

my $name = shift;
my $re   = qr/\A$name attr/; 

my $rec = '';
while (my $line = <>) {
    $rec .= $line;
    next unless $line =~ /^\)/;
    print $rec if $rec =~ /$re/;
    $rec = '';
}

You could turn it into a one-liner like this

perl -ne '$a.=$_;next unless/^\)/;print$a if$a=~/^name/;$a=""' datafile

but I prefer the script. Remember to replace name with the name of the record.

share|improve this answer

I see in your comments to another answer that you also want to search within the block for a string like 'QUALIFIED_CLOCK'.

In that case, if your data blocks are separated by a blank line you can use Perl's paragraph mode to read it in blocks and print out the ones you are interested in. For example:

perl -00 -ne 'print if /^block_name/ and /QUALIFIED_CLOCK/' file.txt

This is also possible in awk by setting RS.

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is elegant! thanks a lot. –  zh_ Apr 3 '09 at 0:41

Here is one way to to it as a Perl one-liner:

perl -ne '$m = 1 if /^insert_name_here attr/; print if $m; $m = 0 if /^\)$/' file.txt
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