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I have a folder on a remote server which we added to git.

git init
git add .
git commit -m "Initial commit"

Then we pull the repository down to my local MacBook. Then I add a file index.js, add to git, and commit. The problem comes, when I try to PUSH the modified repo back to the server. I am getting a crazy error:

Refusing to update checked out branch: refs/heads/master By default, updating the current branch in a non-bare repository is denied, because it will make the index and work tree inconsistent with what you pushed, and will require 'git reset --hard' to match the work tree to HEAD.

Any ideas?

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what command are you using to push? –  sbrichards Aug 17 '11 at 3:58
    
I am using a GUI tool SoureTree, the command is: git push -v --tags origin master:master –  Justin Aug 17 '11 at 4:09
    
try from a terminal doing git push -u origin master –  sbrichards Aug 17 '11 at 4:10
    
Same error: By default, updating the current branch in a non-bare repository is denied, because it will make the index and work tree inconsistent with what you pushed, and will require 'git reset --hard' to match the work tree to HEAD. –  Justin Aug 17 '11 at 4:20

2 Answers 2

A remote repository to which you plan to push should be initialized with the --bare option to prevent Git from creating a working directory. The easiest way to do this would be to init a new bare repo, update your MacBook's remote to point to the new location (should be a folder ending in .git) and push.

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So, the sever basically has a few files, but by default they are ignored. Are you saying to basically do just a git --bare init, and don't do the add and commit on the server? –  Justin Aug 17 '11 at 4:10
    
Correct - the repository will get its initial commit the first time you push. –  dahlbyk Aug 17 '11 at 15:52

This is occurs because you are trying to push to a non bare repo (a repo with a working directory). The working directory is essentially the spot where the file you "checkout" and edit live. When you push to the non bare repo, the situation described in your error message occurs.

A simple solution to this, if you still want to edit files from both your macbook and the remote server, is to create a third repo with git init --bare. You could than push and pull to this repo from your other two repos.

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So the repo is being created originally on the server, this is automated, but editing will occur on the macbook. Is there a solution for this? I tried git --bare init on the server, but still getting the error. –  Justin Aug 17 '11 at 4:22
    
Do you want the repo on the server to have a working directory? –  Andy Aug 17 '11 at 12:37

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