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Let me first preface this by saying I'm new to MySQL!

I'm trying to build a Drupal module that creates a custom list of options for my product attributes. I have an indexed array of dates in descending order and for every date value in the array the query below is supposed to create an attribute option, which is stored in the 'name' field (varchar) of my uc_attribute_options table. However, when I look at the list output or at my 'name' field (looking at it in 'Sort by key: None'), the date values in the output list appear in alphabetical order instead of the same descending order as in my array. I've tried every combination I could think of but I can't seem to "sort" this out.

$aid = 1;
$i = 0;

$date_array = array ( 
"Thursday, August 25, 2011", 
"Thursday, September 1, 2011", 
"Thursday, September 8, 2011", 
"Thursday, September 15, 2011",
"Thursday, September 22, 2011");

foreach ($date_array as $item) {

db_query("INSERT INTO {uc_attribute_options} (aid, name, cost, price,
weight, ordering) VALUES (%d, '%s', %f, %f, %f, %d)", $aid, $item, 0, 0, 0, 0);

...
}

Output:

Thursday, August 25, 2011
Thursday, September 1, 2011
Thursday, September 15, 2011
Thursday, September 22, 2011
Thursday, September 8, 2011

What I would like:

Thursday, August 25, 2011
Thursday, September 1, 2011
Thursday, September 8, 2011
Thursday, September 15, 2011
Thursday, September 22, 2011

How can I get the output to display in the same descending order as is found in the array?

Thanks in advance for any pointers.

share|improve this question
    
try using 2 digit dates? If you're getting these values from MySQL just order them in the query let MySQL do the sorting. –  DustinDavis Aug 17 '11 at 4:39
    
Or better yet, store the dates as actual dates in the DB (see the DATE column type). –  Casper Aug 17 '11 at 4:43
    
@DustinDavis - I tried that approach as a final resort and it does seem to work around the issue. So, it's definitely one way of doing it if there's no other alternative. Thanks for the response. –  user897897 Aug 17 '11 at 5:43
    
@Casper - Yes, ideally that's definitely the correct way of doing it. However, in this particular case that's not an option that's available to me. I have no way of changing the database or modifying the field type to a Date field. Thanks for the response. –  user897897 Aug 17 '11 at 5:43
    
The problem you have with not storing as a date field is April will always come before January. Maybe use the ID field to order by, just insert in the correct order. Hacky but it should work. –  DustinDavis Aug 17 '11 at 14:30

4 Answers 4

Rows in a database have no inherent order. If you do not specify an order when you select them, the database is free to return them in any order it wants. That will not necessarily be insertion order. If you want your output in a specific order, you have to ask for it in that order, not change how you insert the data.

If you want help with that, the code to share is the part that selects the data and displays it, not the part that inserts rows.

share|improve this answer
    
Appreciate the info, very helpful. –  user897897 Aug 17 '11 at 5:51

The order of the things going into the database is usually irrelevant, if this is stored as a date you can use the ORDER BY query to get things in a particular order when retrieving. For example:

SELECT date FROM my_table ORDER BY date ASC; -- or in some cases ASCENDING

You should also be storing a Date type and not a string, this way comparison becomes much easier and strings will sort alphabetically which won't give you the results you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the your response. It's all clear now. Yes, it definitely would have remedied the situation if I could store my values as a Date type. Unfortunately, that wasn't an option. I can't alter or modify any part of the database. Thanks again for the pointer! –  user897897 Aug 17 '11 at 5:31
    
I would consider rewriting the table, storing dates as strings is a bad idea and makes working with them a pain in your case. –  Jesus Ramos Aug 17 '11 at 5:33
    
Agreed! I'll definitely look into it further. Thanks again. –  user897897 Aug 17 '11 at 5:46

There is no "inherent" order of rows in a relational database.

You have to sort according to the contents of the row (either in SQL or in your program), or, if that is not possible, you have to make it possible by adding another column which stores the sort order you want.

In your case, it looks like you can order on a date column (but you need to store the date as such, not as a string, because that will just sort in a meaningless alphabetical way).

If the original array is not always guaranteed to be in a defined order, you may need to add the array index as an extra column -- maybe that is what ordering was for).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the pointer, very helpful info. I was under the impression that there was perhaps an association between the order of the item and the insertion order. Unfortunately I can't modify the field type to a Date field, and so that's largely why I was finding it difficult to work around. looking at the [uc_attributes_schema], it describes the 'ordering' field as 'Affects the list position of the options.' So, as i understand it, it's effectively a field weight that Drupal automatically adds. [uc_attribute_schema] (api.lullabot.com/uc_attribute_schema) –  user897897 Aug 17 '11 at 5:35

<insert comment about row order here>

Ok, so I'm writing this because it is a legit question, even if the application is off (shouldn't matter in a relational database (even with auto_increment), yada yada yada):

$date_array = array ( 
"Thursday, August 25, 2011", 
"Thursday, September 1, 2011", 
"Thursday, September 8, 2011", 
"Thursday, September 15, 2011",
"Thursday, September 22, 2011");

$out = array();
// create an associative array which maps numeric timestamps to the dates.
foreach( $date_array as $date )
    $out[ strtotime( $date ) ] = $date;
// sort the keys (the timestamps)
ksort( $out );

// this will output in timestamp order.
foreach( $out as $item )
{
    db_query("INSERT INTO {uc_attribute_options} (aid, name, cost, price, weight,
       ordering) VALUES (%d, '%s', %f, %f, %f, %d)", $aid, $item, 0, 0, 0, 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for snippet! It definitely puts me in the right direction. Given that I can't change my field type to a Date type, this solution is a perfect fit and helps me get around that constraint. Very helpful. Thanks again. –  user897897 Aug 17 '11 at 5:35
    
I seem to have hit the same roadblock using your suggested solution. It appears to make no difference whether it's an indexed array or an associative array. It produces the same result. Whether it's in timestamp order or in numeric index order, the output is still the same. –  user897897 Aug 17 '11 at 7:18
    
That is why so many have mentioned that the db insert order does not matter terribly much. But I assure you, this works to re-sort the values. –  cwallenpoole Aug 17 '11 at 7:24
    
thanks, I think I'll have a look at it again tomorrow with fresh eyes. –  user897897 Aug 17 '11 at 7:43

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