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Lets say I have some markup like this:

<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
    #container
    {
        margin: 0 auto;
        width: 900px;
        background: green;
    }
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="container">

    </div>
</body>
</html>

Imagine "container" is filled with hundreds of a's for testing purposes of padding.

Now, what I want to do is to make an area of whitespace between the edges of "container" and its content on the left and right hand sides. So I add:

padding-left: 50px;
padding-right: 50px;

Now from what I (thought) I understood, this would mean that if 100 a's fitted per line before, only 80 or so would fit now. In other words, "container" would remain the same width but grow downwards.

However, what I am seeing is that the size of "container" is increasing horizontally and not vertically.

How can I get "container" to grow down vertically and stay the same width horizontally?

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in addition to Garry's answer: w3.org/TR/CSS2/box.html –  Can Berk Güder Apr 2 '09 at 8:57
    
Good link, I've added it to my answer as someone might not check the comments. –  Garry Shutler Apr 2 '09 at 8:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to change the width to 800px and then add your padding. Padding is additive to the width.

    W------W   - original width
   PW------WP  - original width plus padding either side
    PW----WP   - smaller width plus padding either side

Box model courtesy of Can Berk Güder

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Was unaware it worked this way. What an obvious solution. Thanks! –  Tom Apr 2 '09 at 8:56

What garry said, If youre using Chrome or Firebug plugin for Firefox you can right click and "inspect element" and see a visual representation of how your elemenent is being sized, really helps in these situations.

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The affects of adding padding or margin to an element depend entirely on the browser you're viewing the page in. Padding and margin SHOULD be additive as Garry says but that's not the case with IE6 so you'll need to do some research around browser differences and how you can accommodate them in your style rules.

From what it looks like your doing you just want a padding to be applied to the whole page. You could do that by directly referencing body in your CSS. so you'll have -

body
{
    padding:0 50 0 50;
}
share|improve this answer

You could also add a margin to anything inside the div:

<style type="text/css">    
#container    
{    
    margin: 0 auto;    
    width: 900px;    
    background: green;    
}
#container *
{
    margin-left: 50px;
    margin-right: 50px;
}
</style>
share|improve this answer
    
Thats not really going to work is it, think about it. –  Andrew Bullock Apr 2 '09 at 8:58
    
Yeah, that's a bit dangerous as it will add a margin to EVERYTHING in the div. –  Garry Shutler Apr 2 '09 at 9:00
    
@Andrew Bullock: Why not? @Garry Shutler: Yes it will add a margin to everything, but if you know you are only adding one thing its ok, and the OP wanted to think about it as a div of width 800 with a 50px gap before text. –  cjk Apr 2 '09 at 9:24

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