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Since variables names are declared local if there is an assignment to them within a function, and I want to access the module variables from within a function, can I import the module name within the module and then use that to access the module variables ?

Example (file name : server.py):

import server

bar = 5

def foo():
   server.bar = 10
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You don't want only to access, you want to change them. Then the question naturally comes: why do you want to proceed like that , and not with the use of the global statement, which is precisely intended to allow to do that ? –  eyquem Aug 17 '11 at 9:06
    
Your use of the word 'variable' is incorrect. There are variables in other languages, the word being taken in the sense of chunk of memory acting like a box, whose content can change , but not in Python. There are no box-variables in Python, all is object. The only acceptable use of word 'variable' in Python is to designate the name of an object, the only sense in which I saw it used in the official docs. But there's a specific word for this: 'identifier'. So there's no justification to employ the ambiguous and confusioning word 'variable' in Python context. –  eyquem Aug 17 '11 at 9:22
    
You don't want only to access, you want to change them , said I. But it is a supposition of mine. In fact, the motivation of your code is unknown, since it is incomplete. What do you want to obtain with the instruction `server.bar = 10`` ? The question 'why ?' is secondary to the comprehension of what you want to obtain –  eyquem Aug 17 '11 at 10:33
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Instead of using the global statement, as suggested in all of the other answers, don't use module level variables, but a class as a container or else another module just for the globals:

# mg.py

bar = 5

# server.py
import mg

def foo():
    mg.bar = 10

or

class mg:
    bar = 5

def foo():
    mg.bar = 10

This way you don't need to put global statements everywhere, you can re-use those names, and it's clear which bar you're referring to.

Edit: Also, it is possible to import a module inside itself, but you can't change variables in the main module that way. So this would work:

# selfimport.py
import selfimport

def foo():
    print selfimport.foo

bar = 3

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print selfimport.bar
    foo()

But this wouldn't:

# selfimport.py
import selfimport

bar = 3

def foo():
    selfimport.bar = 5

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print selfimport.bar
    foo()
    print bar # bar is still 3!

If you're only using the globals as constants, you wouldn't need the global statement anyway. You also need to make sure to wrap code you only want to execute in the main module in an if statement as above, or you'll recurse.

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+1 for not using a global! –  rubik Aug 17 '11 at 7:24
    
So instead of explicitly indicating usage of global variables you suggest hiding it and relying on implicit mechanisms. I tend to consider that as a harmful advise. –  Wladimir Palant Aug 17 '11 at 7:33
1  
No, I suggest you not use global variables, and you refer to those variables explicitly by using the attribute access notation (rather than implicitly when not assigned to in a scope, as you can do with globals). –  agf Aug 17 '11 at 7:35
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You can't import it like that, and you don't need to. Just use the module-global variable directly.

def foo():
    global bar
    bar = 10

you need to declare it global so it gets set, instead of creating a local variable.

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This is wrong, you can import it like that (not that you should). –  agf Aug 17 '11 at 7:24
    
Technically you can, but you can get some really strange results by doing that. So you can't do that and expect it to work 100% reliably. –  Keith Aug 17 '11 at 7:31
    
I'm not sure what effects you mean, if you do as I suggested and wrap code you only want to use in the main module in if __name__ == '__main__', which you should do anyway? –  agf Aug 17 '11 at 7:34
2  
@agf That doesn't even work. You will have two server module instances. the foo() method thinks it's setting its own modules bar, but it is not. This self-import method may appear to work, but it does not. –  Keith Aug 17 '11 at 7:49
    
You're right. I'm so used to only using globals as constants I didn't think of that. I'll correct my answer. –  agf Aug 17 '11 at 7:51
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Why not:

def foo():
  global bar
  bar = 10
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no, instead use the global statement:

def foo():
    global bar
    bar = 10
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