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I'm looking for some advice to the following problem.

I have a number of classes which are wrappers for many pieces of USB hardware - such as bus programmable power supplies, label printers, data acquisition modules, USB to serial converters, etc.

Each of these classes implement an interface IHardwareDevice, defined as below...

public interface IHardwareDevice
{
    string VID { get; }
    string PID { get; }
}

// Example IHardwareDevice implementation
public class PowerSupply : IHardwareDevice
{
    public string VID
    {
        get { return "0123"; }
    }

    public string PID
    {
        get { return "3210"; }
    }
}

The above interface allows each USB device to specify its own vendor and product ID's.

I also have a static class called DeviceManager, which uses the SetupDixxx device installation functions to detect for the presence of any of the USB devices listed above. This class also has the ability to enable or disable a specified device.

A brief overview of the class is as follows...

public static class DeviceManager
{
    public static T Find<T>() where T : IHardwareDevice, new()
    {
        // Uses the SetupDixxx calls to find a VID and PID match
        // returns new T() or default(T) depending on whether match was found
    }

    public static bool Enable(IHardwareDevice obj)
    {
        // ...
    }

    public static bool Disable(IHardwareDevice obj)
    {
        // ...
    }
}

I had considered using a HardwareDeviceAttribute to decorate each class with (the attribute would contain VID and PID) but I decided against this.

Also, going forward, I want the ability for each of the USB device classes to have their own properties - such as PortName for a USB to serial converter, or PathName for a HID device (to allow CreateFile, ReadFile and WriteFile access), etc. All of which are to be populated from values read from the individual devices registry branch (again using the SetupDixxx function calls). I had considered extending the IHardwareDevice interface to include an InitializeDevice method which would get called by the DeviceManager, but this would need access to a number of unmanaged structs in the hardware class which seems undesirable. Another option would be to decorate the custom properties of the USB device, indicating which are to be populated by DeviceManager.

Now, I guess my question would be - is this or would this be a good implementation of what I'm wanting to achieve? Are there any blatantly obvious improvements that I'm missing? All the code works, so from a suitability point of view it is absolutely fine but is there a better and cleaner implementation - would a Factory (or any other) pattern help me in this instance?

Thanks in advance, K

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Yes, I believe the Factory pattern could help you. If you find yourself doing object creation kinds of activities with multiple sets of objects, consider an Abstract Factory or even a DI container. –  neontapir Nov 1 '12 at 19:13
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1 Answer

I am not very sure, but I think builder pattern might be of help to you. If you construct your object via a builder then you can just initialize with the required number of attributes while leaving the other attributes untouched . wiki link

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