Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a network project, there is no timer in it. just a tcpclient that connect to a server and listen to receive any data from network.

         TcpClient _TcpClient = new TcpClient(_IpAddress, _Port);
        _ConnectThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(ConnectToServer));
        _ConnectThread.IsBackground = true;
        _ConnectThread.Start();


    private void ConnectToServer()
    {
        try
        {
            NetworkStream _NetworkStream = _TcpClient.GetStream();
            byte[] _RecievedPack = new byte[1024 * 1000];
            string _Message = string.Empty;
            int _BytesRead;
            int _Length;

            while (_Flage)
            {
                _BytesRead = _NetworkStream.Read(_RecievedPack, 0, _RecievedPack.Length);
                _Length = BitConverter.ToInt32(_RecievedPack, 0);
                _Message = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString(_RecievedPack, 4, _Length);

                if (_BytesRead != 0)
                {
                    //call a function to manage the data

                    _NetworkStream.Flush();
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception exp)
        {                
            // call a function to alarm that connection is false
        }
    }

But after a while the cpu usage of my application goes up(90%, 85%,...). even if no data receive.

could anybody give me some tips about cpu usage. I'm totally blank. i don't know i should check which part of the project!

share|improve this question
3  
I'm a bit confused by the code - you aren't checking _BytesRead, yet that would appear to be fundamental to the rest of the data - otherwise you don't know whether you have a complete message...? Also - why are you flushing when reading? – Marc Gravell Aug 17 '11 at 7:55

could anybody give me some tips about cpu usage

You should consider checking the loops in the application, like while loop, if you are spend so much time waiting for some condition to became true, then it will take much CPU time. for instance

while (true)
{}

or

while (_Flag)
{
    //do something
}

If the code executed inside the while are synchronous, then the thread will be ending eating much of CPU cycles. to solve this problem you could executes the code inside the while in a different thread, so it will be asynchronous, and then use ManualResetEvent or AutoResetEvent to report back when operation executed, another thing to mentioned is to consider using System.Threading.Thread.Sleep method to till the thread to sleep and give the cpu time to execute other threads, example:

while(_Flag)
{
    //do something

    Thread.Sleep(100);//Blocks the current thread for 100 milliseconds
}
share|improve this answer

There are several issues with your code... the most important ones are IMHO:

  • Use async methods (BeginRead etc.), not blocking methods, and don't create your own thread. Thread are "expensive>" resources - and using blocking calls in threads is therefore a waste of resources. Using async calls lets the operating system call you back when an event (data received for instance) occured, so that no separate thread is needed (the callback runs with a pooled thread).
  • Be aware that Read may return just a few bytes, it doesn't have to fill the _ReceivedPackbuffer. Theoretically, it may just receive one or two bytes - not even enough for your call to ToInt32!
share|improve this answer

The CPU usage spikes, because you have a while loop, which does not do anything, if it does not receive anything from the network. Add Thread.Sleep() at the end of it, if not data was received, and your CPU usage will be normal.

And take the advice, that Lucero gave you.

share|improve this answer

I suspect that the other end of the connection is closed when the while loop is still running, in which case you'll repeatedly read zero bytes from the network stream (marking connection closed; see NetworkStream.Read on MSDN).

Since NetworkStream.Read will then return immediately (as per MSDN), you'll be stuck in a tight while loop that will consume a lot of processor time. Try adding a Thread.Sleep() or detecting a "zero read" within the loop. Ideally you should handle a read of zero bytes by terminating your end of the connection, too.

while (_Flage)
{
    _BytesRead = _NetworkStream.Read(_RecievedPack, 0, _RecievedPack.Length);
    _Length = BitConverter.ToInt32(_RecievedPack, 0);
    _Message = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString(_RecievedPack, 4, _Length);

    if (_BytesRead != 0)
    {
        //call a function to manage the data

        _NetworkStream.Flush();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Have you attached a debugger and stepped through the code to see if it's behaving in the way you expect?

Alternatively, if you have a profiling tool available (such as ANTs) then this will help you see where time is being spent in your application.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.