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How to check upper case existence length in a string using Sql Query?

For Eg:

1.KKart - from this string the result should be 2, because it has 2 upper case letters. 2.WPOaaa - from this string the result should be 3, because it has 3 upper case letters.

Thanks in advance

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As i have mentioned in the request, SQL QUERY ? –  user757207 Aug 17 '11 at 8:11
    
SQL SERVER 2008 R2 –  user757207 Aug 17 '11 at 8:14
    
can anybody help me with this query ? –  user757207 Aug 17 '11 at 9:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is no built-in T-SQL function for that.
You can use a user-defined function like this one:

CREATE FUNCTION CountUpperCase
(
    @input nvarchar(50)
)
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN

    declare @len int
    declare @i int
    declare @count int
    declare @ascii int

    set @len = len(@input)
    set @i = 1
    set @count = 0

    while @i <= @len
    begin

        set @ascii = ascii(substring(@input, @i, 1))

        if @ascii >= 65 and @ascii <= 90
        begin
            set @count = @count +1
        end

        set @i = @i + 1

    end

    return @count

END

Usage (with the examples from your question):

select dbo.CountUpperCase('KKart') returns 2.
select dbo.CountUpperCase('WPOaaa') returns 3.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much :) –  user757207 Aug 17 '11 at 10:13

How about something like this :

SELECT len(replace(my_string_field,'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz','')) as 'UpperLen'
FROM my_table

The principle is simply to replace all lower case char by nothing and counts the remaining.

share|improve this answer
3  
Did you try to run this on the example strings in the question? Your code only replaces the whole string 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz' if it occurs exactly like that. Plus, there can be stuff like numbers in the string which are not upper case or lower case characters at all. –  Christian Specht Aug 17 '11 at 9:25

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