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I use this simple method to retrieve a Query String from a Page a returning a Int. In case not a valid Id can be found I would like return a default value int 0.

I would like to know if there is a better way to write this method, in details:

  • Would be better use just a single return statement instead the two? If yes what is the best way to do it?
  • Shall I perform any other checking when retrieving the Query String?

Thanks for your time on this.

protected int GetPageIndex()
{
    int output;
    bool result = Int32.TryParse(Request.QueryString["page"], out output);
    if(result)
        return output;
    return output = 0; // Return Default value
}
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just initialize it before you try to parse it... Anyways, Int32.TryParse sets the value to 0 if the conversion is unsuccessful... :) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/f02979c7.aspx

protected int GetPageIndex()
    {
        int output = 0;
        Int32.TryParse(Request.QueryString["page"], out output);
        return output;
    }
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2  
It is not necessary to initialize with 0, as TryParse ignores any input value an sets to 0 anyway if conversion fails. If you initialize with another value (int output = 1), it will still have value of 0 after failed conversion. So Initializing it at all might be confusing. –  awe Aug 17 '11 at 9:06
2  
I know. I just like to initialize my variables.... :) –  Erik A. Brandstadmoen Aug 17 '11 at 9:07
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You're safe to simply return output, since you're seemingly not concerned as to whether TryParse succeeded or not, and by assigning a value of 0 to output initially, for clarity, then that is what will be returned if TryParse fails anyway.

protected int GetPageIndex()
{
    int output = 0;
    int.TryParse(Request.QueryString["page"], out output);
    return output;
}
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The exact same reply... Beat you with a minute... ;) –  Erik A. Brandstadmoen Aug 17 '11 at 9:04
    
Time does take its toll, but I've never been beaten with a unit of time before - that would be the ultimate comeuppance for man by its nemesis. ;) –  Grant Thomas Aug 17 '11 at 9:07
    
It is not necessary to initialize with 0, as TryParse ignores any input value an sets to 0 anyway if conversion fails. If you initialize with another value (int output = 1), it will still have value of 0 after failed conversion. So Initializing it at all might be confusing. –  awe Aug 17 '11 at 9:07
    
@awe Please take the time to read my explanation that comes prior to the code snippet (re for clarity; if your views on clarity in this matter differ then so be it, but for me this is clearer since the zero-value is visualised and naturally expected.) –  Grant Thomas Aug 17 '11 at 9:20
    
@Mr. Disappointment: I did read your explanation, and I disagree that this is necessarily clarifying. If I didn't know that TryParse actually set the value to 0, I would think that when I see the output beeing initialized, it means that it is actually effective as default value (which is not, because initiliazing to 1 would have no effect). –  awe Aug 17 '11 at 9:30
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How about this to use less code, with regards to checking the query string I dont think you need to check for null as the try parse should handle the null value.

protected int GetPageIndex()
{
    int output;
    return Int32.TryParse( Request.QueryString[ "page" ], out output ) ? output : 0;
}
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3  
Can people please not downvote without saying why –  WraithNath Aug 17 '11 at 8:54
    
This is certainly the simplest form, and also allows for default value other than 0. –  awe Aug 17 '11 at 9:18
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int output;
return Int32.TryParse(Request.QueryString["page"], out output) ? output : 0;
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3  
Please guys add a comment on the down vote –  GibboK Aug 17 '11 at 8:55
    
@GibboK It's hard to understand this downvote. Yes, the code is not perfect, you can simply return the output variable, but using such a construction it's easier to understand the code. –  Adi Aug 17 '11 at 9:00
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I'd go with

protected int GetPageIndex()
{
    int output = 0;
    Int32.TryParse(Request.QueryString["page"], out output);
    return output; 
}
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1  
So what is the point of result? –  Grant Thomas Aug 17 '11 at 8:52
    
Always returns 0 :D –  Kheldar Aug 17 '11 at 8:56
    
@Mr. Disappointment - you're right, result is redundant, jsut leftover from original code. Edited my answer –  Hassan Aug 17 '11 at 9:10
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