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Float round rounds it up or down. I always need it to round down.

I have the solution but i dont really like it... Maybe there is a better way.

This is what i want:

1.9999.round_down(2) 
#=> 1.99
1.9901.round_down(2)
#=> 1

I came up with this solution but i would like to know if there is a better solution(I dont like that i convert the float twice). Is there already a method for this? Because I found it pretty strange that I couldnt find it.

class Float
  def round_down(n=0)
    ((self * 10**n).to_i).to_f/10**n 
  end
end

Thanks.

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I like your solution... –  reto Aug 17 '11 at 13:53
    
What do you want to do with negative numbers? Toward negative infinity or towards zero? –  l0b0 May 16 '12 at 14:41
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Based on answer from @kimmmo this should be a little more efficient:

class Float
  def round_down n=0
  s = self.to_s
  l = s.index('.') + 1 + n
  s.length <= l ? self : s[0,l].to_f
  end
end

1.9991.round_down(3)
 => 1.999
1.9991.round_down(2)
 => 1.99
1.9991.round_down(0)
 => 1.0
1.9991.round_down(5)
 => 1.9991

or based on answer from @steenslag, probably yet more efficient as there is no string conversion:

class Float
  def round_down n=0
    n < 1 ? self.to_i.to_f : (self - 0.5 / 10**n).round(n)
  end
end
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This answer is also good. Still prefer @kimmmo his solution because it is shorter and easier to read. But this is also a good answer! Thanks –  Michael Koper Aug 17 '11 at 10:29
    
@michaelkoper: look into the second solution - I think it is more straightforward and yet more efficient. –  geronime Aug 17 '11 at 11:01
3  
In my quick speed test, this string version is about twice as fast as kimmmo's split version, and the second version using actual math is about 4 times faster still. Math: good for numbers. –  glenn mcdonald Aug 17 '11 at 15:00
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1.9999.to_i
#=> 1
1.9999.floor
#=> 1

answered 1 sec ago fl00r

"%.2f" % 1.93213
#=> 1.93

@kimmmo is right.

class Float
  def round_down(n=0)
    self.to_s[/\d+\.\d{#{n}}/].to_f
  end
end
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1  
"%.2f" % 1.935 => 1.94, the asker wants it to return 1.93 –  kimmmo Aug 17 '11 at 9:39
    
@kimmmo, oh, I got it –  fl00r Aug 17 '11 at 9:41
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Looks like you just want to strip decimals after n

class Float
  def round_down(n=0)
    int,dec=self.to_s.split('.')
    "#{int}.#{dec[0..n]}".to_f
  end
end


1.9991.round_down(3)
 => 1.999
1.9991.round_down(2)
 => 1.99
1.9991.round_down(0)
 => 1.0
1.9991.round_down(10)
 => 1.9991

(Edit: slightly more efficient version without the regexp)

share|improve this answer
    
Hey I like this idea! –  Michael Koper Aug 17 '11 at 9:46
    
Shouldn't 1.9991.round_down(0) return 1 instead of 1.0? –  Mischa Aug 17 '11 at 9:55
    
@mischa 1.0 just means it's still a float. I suppose you could build in functionality to use to_i if n == 0, but that could probably give someone headaches debugging. –  brymck Aug 17 '11 at 10:06
    
Thanks mate. This answer is good enough. :-) –  Michael Koper Aug 17 '11 at 10:28
2  
You are doing math with strings.. how disgusting! :) –  reto Aug 17 '11 at 13:52
show 2 more comments

You could use the floor method

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Float.html#M000142

share|improve this answer
    
Float#floor will never turn 1.999 into 1.99. –  kimmmo Aug 17 '11 at 9:33
    
I think floor is the same as to_i. It returns the highest Integer. –  Michael Koper Aug 17 '11 at 9:39
    
This is the correct answer. You could've added an example though. –  boulder_ruby May 18 '13 at 20:37
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In Ruby 1.9:

class Float
  def floor_with_prec(prec = 0)
    (self - 0.5).round(prec)
  end
end
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(1.9990 - 0.5).round(2) => 1.5 (asker wants it to return 1.99) –  kimmmo Aug 17 '11 at 9:54
1  
@kimmmo Right. You can get around that with a minor revision, I think: (self - 0.5 / 10**prec).round(prec). I'm not sure whether this will get beaten up by floating point issues, though. –  brymck Aug 17 '11 at 10:02
add comment
class Float
  def rownd_down(digits = 1)
    ("%.#{digits+1}f" % self)[0..-2].to_f
  end 
end

> 1.9991.rownd_down(3)
=> 1.999
> 1.9991.rownd_down(2)
=> 1.99
> 1.9991.rownd_down(10)
> 1.9991
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