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Is there anyone that have made any comparison between build times for similar sized C++ and C# projects ?

We are trying to convince our IT drone that a multi-million line C++ projects with heavy template usages, complies slower than a similar sized C# project and the extra money spent on memory and SSD disks are well spent.

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It would depend entirely on the compiler, so giving us details of which compilers and versions you are using would be a good start. –  mdm Aug 17 '11 at 9:56
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This looks like a duplicate post see this link for more info. Yes looks like C# does compile faster. [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/1062140/… –  Jethro Aug 17 '11 at 9:58
    
See also: blogs.msdn.com/b/ricom/archive/2005/05/13/… –  Rowland Shaw Aug 17 '11 at 9:58
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Why is a similar size of codebase relevant? Surely it's a similar size of project that matters, in terms of functionality achieved. And surely you should be measuring difference in speed between "with more memory and an SSD" and "with less memory and no SSD" - why is the language relevant? –  Jon Skeet Aug 17 '11 at 10:02
    
The size of the project doesn't necessarily dictate compile time; the complexity also affects it. Your comment on memory and SSDs is irrelevant: if you're writing in VB6 there's no compilation time at all, but that's not an argument to go buy a faster disk. What's your actual problem? –  Dan Puzey Aug 17 '11 at 10:03

3 Answers 3

We are trying to convince our IT drone that a multi-million line C++ projects with heavy template usages, complies slower than a similar sized C# project and the extra money spent on memory and SSD disks are well spent.

That's for sure a common and really important problem of C++. I think it's the most urgent to fix in the next version of C++, mybe using Modules. It's a language design problem, linked to the way c++ compilation unit are organized.

Anyway, there are efforts to fix that by making compilers fasters. The most important effort currently is CLang.

For sources about the compilation time, there are tons (google : unity build, c++ compilation time)

But I think a demonstration would be better. Take boost (http://boost.org), compile it. It's a big set of libraries so it can easily compare with a big code source base in C#.

About using ssd to boost c++ compilation, here is a study : http://exdream.com/Blog/post/2009/05/03/Visual-Studio-compile-times-on-different-disk-drives-and-SSDs.aspx

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I never did a comparison like this on similar projects, where similar you probably mean the same row count. But what I usually noticed on my experience, is that C++ compiles much slower. I suppose cause it passes more steps during compilation, one of with linking which can be pretty slow.

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But i belive, unless you use Ngen.exe on your project all the C# projects are 2 stage compilation process which we already know. But on C++, its one step compilation (No JITing). I guess there is a bit of difference in build times.Perhaps Jon Skeet should have a perfect answer.

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"C++ is so slow to compile as the header files have to be reread and reparse every time they are included." take a look here. stackoverflow.com/questions/1062140/… –  Jethro Aug 17 '11 at 10:01
    
But as it says poor handling of header files. But see the other face, here only half compilation is happening which you cant consider as in c++ case right? –  zenwalker Aug 17 '11 at 10:08
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Well, obviously the JIT compiler optimizes some stuff... well, I guess for fairness you could compile c++ to LVVM. It'd still take longer. C++ is complex, and symbol resolution at compile time is slow. C# is much simpler, and that's why we can enjoy symbol resolution even at design time. –  Gleno Aug 17 '11 at 10:10

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