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When initializing primitive types like int or pointers one can use either copy-initialization or direct-initialization.

int a = 10;
int b(10);

Although the latter way is preffered for objects with constructors, I don't see people using it for primitives. I understand that it is kind of "more natural" (especially for numbers) to use the '=' operator but is there anybody writing things like in real-life code:

for (int i(0); i < 5; ++i) {
    cout << i << endl;
}

Thanks.

EDIT: The question asks about coding styles and best practices rather than technical implementation.

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1  
so what if there were? –  Nim Aug 17 '11 at 11:11
    
"Do you ever write code like this?" isn't really a suitable question for SO... –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 17 '11 at 11:12
1  
I've seen code like this and I don't like it. I even initialize class-type variables using the copy initialization syntax if possible. Copy elisions FTW. –  sellibitze Aug 17 '11 at 11:19
    
@Oli Charlesworth I am asking for best practices and recommended styles. –  Petr Aug 17 '11 at 11:29
    
Subjective and broad questions like this are not for Stack Overflow. –  Delan Azabani Aug 17 '11 at 11:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Some people do this to be consistent.

Inside a template, the code could be

for (T i(0); i < 5; ++i) {
    cout << i << endl;
}

and writing it that way everywhere would make the coding style consistent.

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Why couldn't it be written the other way around inside a template? –  Antonio Pérez Aug 18 '11 at 12:01
    
This saves type T from having an assignment operator taking a 0. It is enough to have a constructor. –  Bo Persson Aug 18 '11 at 12:08
    
To have a constructor taking a 0, right? So it would work if writing i = 0 anyway. –  Antonio Pérez Aug 19 '11 at 6:31
    
Not if the constructor is explicit. The idea is to minimize the requirements on the type T, so the code works in as many cases as possible. –  Bo Persson Aug 19 '11 at 6:33
    
In this case you require that type T behaves almost like an int, so it implements a constructor taking an int, the operator< and the prefix operator++. It's just a non-sense that type T provides all these and not the assignment operator for int. IMHO it is not worth to spread a harder to read code style through your codebase just for this reason. –  Antonio Pérez Aug 19 '11 at 7:18

Both are initialization using the copy constructor, even though the first looks like an assignment. It's just syntactic sugar.

You could check it easily with a class that prints out something at copy construction and something different at assignment.

And int being a primitive doesn't even come into play.

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I prefer the i = 0 style, it is easier to read, and you can also use it in like this:

if (int i = some_function())
{
}

Works also fine with pointers, and all other types convertible to bool:

if (const int* p = some_function())
{
}

if (shared_ptr<const int> q = some_function())
{
}
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I used to have a colleague doing so:

for (int i(0); i < 5; ++i) {
    cout << i << endl;
}

and it really pissed everyone off. It's far easier to read the code using i = 0 than i(0). Maybe not in this example but, as a general rule, it is.

Even for complex objects, I always prefer the i = 0 style, it just feels more natural for the reader and any decent compiler will optimize the generated code so there is virtually no performance penalty.

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