Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Question: suppose you have a XML

<rootelement>
  <transaction>
    <code>not found</code>
    <status>404</status>
  </transaction>
  <data>
      <item>Whatever</item>
  </data>
</rootelement>

And another XML file:

<rootelement2>
  <transaction>
    <code>not found</code>
    <status>404</status>
  </transaction>
  <searchresult>
    <item>Whatever</item>
  </searchresult>
</rootelement2>

Now, furthermore suppose the tags transaction, searchresult and data are not present, and therefore, their child elements have a namespace instead.

(See here Serializing XML with strange namespaces?)

Is there a way I can have one class for everything transaction, one class for everything data, and one class for everything searchresult, and then create a class SearchResultRequest which encapsulates transaction + its own respective content (without the enclosing tags <transaction> and <searchresult>),

Something like

class SearchResultRequest
{
    <XML_SerializeContentOnly_Here()>
    public cTransaction Transaction = new cTransaction();

    <XML_SerializeContentOnly_Here()>
    public cSearchResult SearchResult = new cSearchResult();
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you explain: Is there a way I can have one class for everything transaction, one class for everything data, and one class for everything searchresult, – thekip Aug 17 '11 at 12:38
    
For your result class, you might try using XElement.Load() for each set and adding the returned XElement to your results. – Chuck Savage Aug 17 '11 at 13:48
    
Can you write up an example, of how you want a resulting XML to look like, and how resulting class(es) would look like? – Vladimir Perevalov Aug 29 '11 at 18:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.