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How can I declare an element in DTD that is self-closing or contains elements? I have found the *-operator, but I can't verify if this can also validate empty elements.

I have tried this, but it gives a compilation error in Visual Studio saying that the EMPTY element is not declared:

<!ELEMENT File (Annotations|EMPTY)>
<!ELEMENT Annotations (State*)>
<!ELEMENT State EMPTY>

Or I could try the following, but I can't validate if it is ok:

<!ELEMENT File (Annotations?)>
...
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, your element declaration for File is correct:

<!ELEMENT File (Annotations?)>

What you're saying is that File can contain zero or one Annotations element.

Also, if you would've used * instead of ?, you would've been saying File can contain zero or more Annotations elements.

Valid examples:

<!DOCTYPE File [
<!ELEMENT File (Annotations?)>
<!ELEMENT Annotations (State*)>
<!ELEMENT State EMPTY>
]>
<File/>

<!DOCTYPE File [
<!ELEMENT File (Annotations?)>
<!ELEMENT Annotations (State*)>
<!ELEMENT State EMPTY>
]>
<File></File>

<!DOCTYPE File [
<!ELEMENT File (Annotations?)>
<!ELEMENT Annotations (State*)>
<!ELEMENT State EMPTY>
]>
<File>
  <Annotations/>
</File>
share|improve this answer
    
So containing zero elements is the same declaration as saying: this element will have an ending slash on the same line? That was my question actually... –  Marnix Aug 17 '11 at 22:27
    
Yes. Zero means that you can have an empty element (element with no content). That really has nothing to do with an ending slash being on the same line. XML editors and/or processors may treat line breaking differently. I've added a couple of examples. –  Daniel Haley Aug 17 '11 at 23:01
    
Thanks for the verification. The examples are exactly what I was looking for. –  Marnix Aug 22 '11 at 15:09

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