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I am using Spring MVC 3.0.5 and Spring Security 3.1.0RC2. I have gotten Active Directory authentication to work in my site and the basic <security:intercept-url /> XML works to filter who can access what page. What I want to do now is add something so that instead of looking at the XML for someone accessing a page, I want to check the database. The site I am building is supposed to let administrators change what groups can access what pages, so I need to do it through the database. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.

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3 Answers

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You can implement a custom PermissionEvaluator that queries your database. Then use the @PreAuthorize annotation on your controller methods, passing along the "page name" to the custom PermissionEvaluator so it can use it in the database query.

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Securing pages is quite easy - let Spring Security do it for you. In your Controller, just annotate. Either:

@Secured("ROLE_SOME_ROLE")
@Controller
public class MySecuredController {
    @RequestMapping("/foo")
    public String myHander() {
       ...
    }
}

or

@Controller
public class MyController {
    @Secured("ROLE_SOME_ROLE")
    @RequestMapping("/foo")
    public String mySecuredHander() {
       ...
    }
}
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But how do I do that dynamically? I want an administrator to be able to change these settings through the website, presumably through a database. –  Nik Aug 17 '11 at 14:03
    
Hm, not sure you can do that. Also, it doesn't seem like a best practice to change what defines access to a give resource while the application is live; generally at runtime you change who has access, not what defines access. What is the business case? –  atrain Aug 17 '11 at 14:15
    
It's what my boss wants. –  Nik Aug 17 '11 at 14:18
    
Then you might want to ditch @Secured and implement your own custom AccessDecisionManager. Then you override intrinsic functionality and can do whatever you want. –  atrain Aug 17 '11 at 14:35
    
Here's what Spring has to say: static.springsource.org/spring-security/site/… –  atrain Aug 18 '11 at 19:16
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You cna use a database to control this using this in the config

 <authentication-manager>
    <authentication-provider>
      <jdbc-user-service data-source-ref="dbDataSource"/>
    </authentication-provider>
  </authentication-manager>

where the db Data Source is a datasource bean of the database

As long as the database has the authentication tables spring looks for it will pick these up by default, but you can also configure other options. ie User Authorities i assume you are already using

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I have a data access object bean that will read from the database. That's not the issue. How do I go about saying 'Yes' or 'No' for a given page access request? –  Nik Aug 17 '11 at 12:29
    
You can set access on the page to correspond to the users role - <intercept-url pattern="/secure/**" access="ROLE_USER" requires-channel="https"/> –  Chris Aug 17 '11 at 12:31
    
Also your question said What I want to do now is add something so that instead of looking at the XML for someone accessing a page, I want to check the database, this is what i answered firstly you didnt state you had your datasource set up in the question please be more specific –  Chris Aug 17 '11 at 12:34
    
This is not at all what I am looking for. I don't want to get rid of AD authentication. I want to authenticate against AD, get the user's assigned groups, and then use them to check page access against a DB table. The XML you provided is a replacement to the AD authentication part and doesn't have anything to do with programmatic access checking. –  Nik Aug 17 '11 at 12:35
    
Spring should be giving you this functionality automatically if you are using the authentication manager , it will query your db which you have already set up and retrieve the user and their roles and allow access based on the roles they have. –  Chris Aug 17 '11 at 12:44
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