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I have a class like this one:

public class Foo
{
    public readonly int A = 1;
    public readonly int B = 2;
}

When I run VS2010 built in Code Analysis tool, I get 2 identical warnings: that 'field '...' is visible outside of its declaring type, change its accessibility to private and add a property, with the same accessibility as the field has currently, to provide access to it'.

I want to suppress this warning for all fields in my class Foo, but I don't want to mark every field with SuppressMessage attribute like this:

public class Foo
{
    [SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Design", "CA1051:DoNotDeclareVisibleInstanceFields")]
    public readonly int A = 1;
    [SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Design", "CA1051:DoNotDeclareVisibleInstanceFields")]
    public readonly int B = 2;
}

I want to mark all class members, using code like this:

[SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Design", "CA1051:DoNotDeclareVisibleInstanceFields")]
public class Foo
{
    public readonly int A = 1;
    public readonly int B = 2;
}

But this code doesn't work, I still get a code analysis warning. How can I do it correctly?

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I think you found a bug, post to connect.microsoft.com –  Hans Passant Aug 17 '11 at 13:11
    
any final solution about it? –  Kiquenet Feb 5 '13 at 7:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There is no way to suppress more than 1 message at a time using SuppressMessageAttribute.

As discussion can be found here, but the relevant part is:

You are running into a common misunderstanding about SuppressMessage.

Each time you put a SuppressMessage in a source file, you suppress exactly one problem (one "row" in the grid). Period.

A SuppressMessage may be placed either "near" the violation or at the module-level. Module-level, assembly-level, and global suppression all mean the same thing. By placing at the module-level, you do not suppress multiple instances of the problem at once. You merely get to locate the SuppressMessage in a different place of the code. The main benefit is that you can, for example, collect all the suppressions related to the assembly in a single file (for example, GlobalSuppressions.cs).

When you use a module-level SuppressMessage, you must specify the Target. The Target must match exactly what is reported in the GUI for a violation of the rule.

There is no way to use SuppressMessage to suppress a rule for the entire scope of a class or the entire scope of a namespace.

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Thanks you very much! It seems I really didn't understand SuppressMessage concept correctly! Your ansver helped me much. Now I got the idea. –  feorex Aug 19 '11 at 5:53

You can create the CodeAnalysis rules file with a set of rules like:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RuleSet Name="New Rule Set" Description=" " ToolsVersion="10.0">
  <Rules AnalyzerId="Microsoft.Analyzers.ManagedCodeAnalysis"
         RuleNamespace="Microsoft.Rules.Managed">
    <Rule Id="CA1111" Action="Ignore" />
  </Rules>
</RuleSet>

See step by step walkthrough:

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, but I don't want to suppress this rule for the all code in my application. Is there a way to suppress this rule for the one class only? –  feorex Aug 19 '11 at 5:55
    
@feorex: IIRC you can define SupressMessage attribute for any particular method –  sll Apr 11 '13 at 13:24

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