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Is there a purely CSS-based way to size a block-level element such that it fills its parent as much as possible, but remains square?


An interesting use case

I have written a very simple analogue clock using mostly CSS, and a pinch of JavaScript.

http://jsbin.com/iqicuk

It has been written scalably:

http://jsbin.com/emiyer

I would like to scale it to fill the page, but stay in proportion, obviously.

If I set the width and height of #clock to 100%, of course, it will be pulled out of proportion:

http://jsbin.com/esubol

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Totally misread the question. It isn't possible :) –  Layke Aug 17 '11 at 13:07
    
What is the child element? –  thirtydot Aug 17 '11 at 13:08
    
Any block-level element. If you want, you can assume that the element and its parent are both div elements. –  Delan Azabani Aug 17 '11 at 13:09
    
I was really hoping you'd say it was an image: jsbin.com/avegut. In retrospect, I'm sure you'd have said image if you meant image. –  thirtydot Aug 17 '11 at 13:14
    
Yeah, it's nice having that ability for images. So disappointing that it's limited to images. –  Delan Azabani Aug 17 '11 at 13:15

4 Answers 4

You can't do that with pure CSS, but you can do it with Javascript - and I assume you have Javascript running anyway to resize the parent element.

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That's disappointing. –  Delan Azabani Aug 17 '11 at 13:06
    
Why would he use Javascript to resize the parent element? –  Nayish Aug 17 '11 at 13:06
    
I posted before the clock link was added - I assumed he was trying to fit it to a dynamic parent object, not the viewport –  Jens Roland Aug 17 '11 at 13:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A solution in progress

thirtydot came up with a very clever technique that takes advantage of the fact that images with only one defined dimension scale proportionately, and he harnesses this to size the element. We now have a clock that can scale properly, but only if the viewport width is greater than the height, not the other way around:

http://jsbin.com/isixug

Likewise, if we change img and #clock to have a defined width, instead of a defined height, then we have a clock that can scale properly, but only if the viewport height is greater than the width:

http://jsbin.com/awucun


The solution

We can combine the two 'tricks' above, that each only work for one orientation, by using a media query for orientation, and specifying the right 'trick' depending on the viewport orientation. We now have a completely scalable clock, no matter what the viewport orientation or size:

http://jsbin.com/okodib

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Nice teamwork! It's perfect in Firefox, but it doesn't seem to scale properly in Chrome/Safari (if that matters). –  thirtydot Aug 17 '11 at 14:30
    
I will attempt to work on Chrome and Safari tomorrow; it's quite late now. Thanks for the heads up! ;) –  Delan Azabani Aug 17 '11 at 14:46

As Jens Roland already said, this is not possible through pure CSS. Maybe LESS is helpful to you.

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Any in flow block level element will already inherit the width from its parent. For the height however you will need to find an alternative.

I doubt this is something you will want to do but if you set your parent to position: relative; and then the child you want to make fill up that parent position: absolute;. Then specify where it needs to stick to relative to its parent with top:0;left:0;bottom:0;right:0;.

However this solution has compatibility issues in lower versions of IE and is rarely acceptable for application...

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Your suggested solution won't actually result in a square; see jsbin.com/ifijuv/2 –  Delan Azabani Aug 17 '11 at 13:14

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