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I am really new at Perl and have been trying to piece together a solution for this. When I run this program I don't get any errors and it doesn't display anything.

The code is as follows:

#!/usr/bin/perl
open (DATA, "<test1.txt") or die ("Unable to open file");
use strict; use warnings;
my $search_string = "Ball";
while ( my $row = <DATA> ) {

    last unless $row =~ /\S/;
    chomp $row;
    my @cells = split /\t/, $row;

    if ($cells[0] =~/$search_string/){
        print $cells[0];
    }
}

my test data file looks like this

Camera Make     Camera Model    Text    Ball    Swing
a       b       c       d       e
f       g       h       i       j
k       l       m       n       o

I am trying to see how this works before i use the actual test data file..

So how do I search for say "Ball" and have it return "d i n"

share|improve this question
1  
You're not asking to help with Perl. You're asking to write an assignment for you, since your code above has NOTHING to do with what your last line is asking for. Please write up an algorithm you're trying to implement in Perl and then ask why your Perl implementation doesn't work - currently, the answer to your question is "your code has nothing to do with what your task is" –  DVK Aug 17 '11 at 13:29
    
I promise this isn't an assignment... but anyway ... How isn't this applicable.. I am defining what I am looking for and splitting the text by /\t/ which is tab i do believe and storing it in an array.. what I am asking is "how do i search that array and get the associated columns? –  David Boord Aug 17 '11 at 13:34
1  
see the hint in my answer. You're parsing the file correctly; you're just not employing the logic/algorithm that solves your problem. The hint should be enough to get your ball rolling (no pun intended) –  DVK Aug 17 '11 at 13:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this instead:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

open (DATA, "<test1.txt") or die ("Unable to open file");
my $search_string = "Ball";

my $header = <DATA>;
my @header_titles = split /\t/, $header;
my $extract_col = 0;

for my $header_line (@header_titles) {
  last if $header_line =~ m/$search_string/;
  $extract_col++;
}

print "Extracting column $extract_col\n";

while ( my $row = <DATA> ) {
  last unless $row =~ /\S/;
  chomp $row;
  my @cells = split /\t/, $row;
  print "$cells[$extract_col] ";
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works... but I don't understand how you got it to do what it did... when you said 'my $header = <DATA>' that takes the file and puts it into the $header and then the @header titles you split the header file by tabs but wouldn't that put the column names in the rows and not columns? –  David Boord Aug 17 '11 at 13:51
    
@David: That is not how <> works. In scalar context, it reads a single line from the file. Please read the I/O operators part of the perlop manual. –  Conspicuous Compiler Aug 17 '11 at 14:10
    
It would be nice practice if you use three argument open –  Nikhil Jain Aug 17 '11 at 14:11
    
@Nikhil: There is no advantage to using a harder-to-read syntax with a fixed file name, especially when I was attempting to mimic the style of the original code as much as possible. –  Conspicuous Compiler Aug 17 '11 at 14:13
    
@Con Yes there is. By using outdated pragmas you keep them alive. Always use the recommended three argument open, and you will never have a problem. –  TLP Aug 17 '11 at 14:20

Try this out:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
use List::MoreUtils qw<first_index>;

my $column = first_index { $_ eq 'Ball' } split /\t/, <DATA>;
say Data::Dumper->Dump( [ $column ], [ '*column' ] );
my @balls  = map { [split /\t/]->[$column] } <DATA>;
say Data::Dumper->Dump( [ \@balls ], [ '*balls' ] );
__DATA__
Camera Make Camera Model    Text    Ball    Swing
a   b   c   d   e
f   g   h   i   j
k   l   m   n   o

You would pretty much have to change the handle from DATA to some file you open-ed.

open( my $in, '<', '/path/to/data.file' ) 
    or die "Could not open file: $!"
    ;

And then substitute <DATA> for <$in>.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Cool solution ;) –  TLP Aug 17 '11 at 19:58

The reason you don't get any errors is because your program does exactly what you told it to (print all first column values that contain the string "Ball"). Since none of the cells in the first column contain that string, your program prints nothing.

Your problem is not with your Perl (it could use some minor stylistic improvement - specifically you're using obsolete form of open() - but is mostly fine), it's with your algorithm.

HINT: your first task in the algorithm should be finding WHICH column (by number) is the "Ball" column.

share|improve this answer

You can use Text::CSV_XS to very conveniently extract the data for you. It might be overkill for your limited data, but it is a very solid solution.

Here I just use the DATA tag to contain the data, but if you prefer, you can replace that with a filehandle, such as open my $fh, '<', 'text1.txt'; and change *DATA to $fh.

Output:

d i n

Code:

use warnings;
use strict;
use Text::CSV_XS;
use autodie;

my $csv = Text::CSV_XS->new( { sep_char => "\t" } );
my @list;
$csv->column_names ($csv->getline (*DATA));
while ( my $hr = $csv->getline_hr(*DATA) ) {
    push @list, $hr->{'Ball'};
}

print "@list\n";
__DATA__
Camera Make Camera Model    Text    Ball    Swing
a   b   c   d   e
f   g   h   i   j
k   l   m   n   o

ETA: If you're going to cut & paste to try it out, make sure that the tabs are carried over in the data.

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