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I'm struggling to understand the difference between shell_exec() and exec()...

I've always used exec() to execute server side commands, when would I use shell_exec()?

Is shell_exec() just a shorthand for exec()? It seems to be the same thing with fewer parameters.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 84 down vote accepted

shell_exec returns all of the output stream as a string. exec returns the last line of the output.

See

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If you need the exit-value AND all of the output you're probably still better of using "exec" rather than "shell_exec". As soon as you pass the output parameter to "exec", it will be filled with every line of the output, it seems to me "exec" can everything of "shell_exec" and more :) –  Preexo May 23 '13 at 9:46

shell_exec - Execute command via shell and return the complete output as a string

exec - Execute an external program.

The difference is that with shell_exec you get output as a return value.

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Here are the differences. Note the newlines at the end.

> shell_exec('date')
string(29) "Wed Mar  6 14:18:08 PST 2013\n"
> exec('date')
string(28) "Wed Mar  6 14:18:12 PST 2013"

> shell_exec('whoami')
string(9) "mark\n"
> exec('whoami')
string(8) "mark"

> shell_exec('ifconfig')
string(1244) "eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 10:bf:44:44:22:33  \n          inet addr:192.168.0.90  Bcast:192.168.0.255  Mask:255.255.255.0\n          inet6 addr: fe80::12bf:ffff:eeee:2222/64 Scope:Link\n          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1\n          RX packets:16264200 errors:0 dropped:1 overruns:0 frame:0\n          TX packets:7205647 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0\n          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 \n          RX bytes:13151177627 (13.1 GB)  TX bytes:2779457335 (2.7 GB)\n"...
> exec('ifconfig')
string(0) ""

Note that use of the backtick operator is identical to shell_exec().

Update: I really should explain that last one. Looking at this answer years later even I don't know why that came out blank! Daniel explains it above -- it's because exec only returns the last line, and ifconfig's last line happens to be blank.

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what happens if there is one error occurs with command..? I am getting the error /No such file or directory but how can I capture it to a variable ???? –  Happy Coder Mar 11 '13 at 19:43
    
@AlwinAugustin: Huh? Might be being written to STDERR. Try adding 2>&1 to the end of your command to redirect STDERR to STDOUT if you're on a linux machine. –  Mark Mar 11 '13 at 21:06
    
I have addedd it also . But still I am getting 0 as the value. I have used one wc -l command and if the file is not there, I need to get the error message saying No such file or directory. –  Happy Coder Mar 12 '13 at 4:02

A couple of distinctions that weren't touched on here:

  • With exec(), you can pass an optional param variable which will receive an array of output lines. In some cases this might save time, especially if the output of the commands is already tabular.

Compare:

exec('ls', $out);
var_dump($out);
// Look an array

$out = shell_exec('ls');
var_dump($out);
// Look -- a string with newlines in it

Conversely, if the output of the command is xml or json, then having each line as part of an array is not what you want, as you'll need to post-process the input into some other form, so in that case use shell_exec.

It's also worth pointing out that shell_exec is an alias for the backtic operator, for those used to *nix.

$out = `ls`;
var_dump($out);
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good example to see the differences is to try these commands: date, whoami, ifconfig, netstat.

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7  
would be nice if you pasted the results here. –  Mark Mar 6 '13 at 22:17

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