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This is my first foray into C++ templates, and I'm trying to construct a BinaryTree template to help me with a Project Euler problem; however, I seem to be getting an error where BinaryTree class doesn't recognize all the constructors of the BinaryTreeNode! Here's a snippet of the code.

template <class T>
class BinaryTreeNode
{
private:
    BinaryTreeNode<T>* _left;
    BinaryTreeNode<T>* _right;
    T* _value;

public:
    BinaryTreeNode();
    explicit BinaryTreeNode(const T& value) : _value(&(T(value))) {}
    BinaryTreeNode(BinaryTreeNode<T>& left, BinaryTreeNode<T>& right, const T& value) :
        _left(&left), _right(&right), _value(&(T(value))){}
};

The BinaryTree class

#include "BinaryTreeNode.h"
template <class T>
class BinaryTree
{
private:
    BinaryTreeNode<T>* _root;
    BinaryTreeNode<T>* _current;
    unsigned int size;

public:
    BinaryTree() : size(0), _root(0), _current(0) { }
    explicit BinaryTree(BinaryTree<T>& leftTree, BinaryTree<T>& rightTree, const T& value) : 
        size(leftTree.Size() + rightTree.Size() + 1), _root(leftTree.Root(), rightTree.Root(), value), _current(_root) {}
    explicit BinaryTree(const T& value) : size(1), _root(value) {}
    const BinaryTreeNode<T>& Root() const { return *_root;}
};

I'm getting these errors.

error C2359: 'BinaryTree<T>::_root' : member of non-class type requires single initializer expression
error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'const int' to 'BinaryTreeNode<T> *'
error C2439: 'BinaryTree<T>::_root' : member could not be initialized

The BinaryTreeNode constructor of (BinaryTreeNode<T>&, BinaryTreeNode<T>&, const T& value) works when I include it in my main code, but it doesn't seem to work under my BinaryTree template. Anyone know why?

share|improve this question
2  
You are missing ; at the end of your classes. The explicit keyword is only useful on constructor with a single parameter. _value(&(T(value))) initializes _value with a pointer to a temporary that will be destroyed right after the statement, resulting in a dangling pointer. BinaryTreeNode::BinaryTreeNode() is declared but not defined, is this on purpose? If so, you should make it private. – Luc Touraille Aug 17 '11 at 14:29
    
@Luc Touraille Really a good answer rather than a comment. – neuront Aug 17 '11 at 14:34
    
@neuront Not really since I did not take the time to find what the real problem was, that was just some issues I spotted quickly. – Luc Touraille Aug 17 '11 at 14:38
    
What does this tree do, that std::set can't do? – UncleBens Aug 17 '11 at 14:41
    
@UncleBens: nothing yet. I'm just using this as an exercise for learning C++. – Nick Babcock Aug 17 '11 at 14:45
up vote 4 down vote accepted

In your initialization expression _root(leftTree.Root(), rightTree.Root(), value), _root is a pointer. You can only initialize it to another pointer. Perhaps you mean to initialize it to a pointer to a new node constructed on those arguments?

This could be done like this: (updated after your edit)

_root(new BinaryTreeNode<T>(leftTree.Root(), rightTree.Root(), value))

However, this is very dangerous (think about an exception in the allocation), and you should probably avoid using raw pointers in your class design and instead use smart managing pointers.

Similarly, the initializer _root(value) does the wrong thing, you might want:

_root(new BinaryTreeNode<T>(value))

(Also note that you should initialize members in their order of declaration.)

Update: I changed the first constructor call following your edit, but as @Luc says, your constructors take non-const arguments but Root() only provides a const reference, so you still need to fix that.

share|improve this answer
    
Your immediate solution didn't work, but it looks like I'm going to have to investigate (google) smart pointers. EDIT: From your immediate solution, I get a `cannot convert parameter 1 from 'const BinaryTreeNode<T>' to 'BinaryTreeNode<T> &' – Nick Babcock Aug 17 '11 at 14:37
    
You're not saying what the Root() function does, so I did some guess work. Provide more specifics and we can take a look. A std::shared_ptr is probably a good start for your situation. – Kerrek SB Aug 17 '11 at 14:39
    
Another edit mistake, I should probably proofread my questions before submitting! Anyways, I added the Root function. – Nick Babcock Aug 17 '11 at 14:41
    
@Nick: Root returns a reference to a const BinaryTreeNode, while BinaryTreeNode's constructor takes a reference to a non-const BinaryTreeNode, hence the error. You could provide a non-const overload of Root that returns a non-const reference. – Luc Touraille Aug 17 '11 at 15:33
    
Ok done. But that still doesn't solve my error: nowhere in my BinaryTree class can I use the constructor: _root = new BinaryTreeNode<T>(BinaryTreeNode<T>& left, BinaryTreeNode<T>& right, T& value). But I can use that exact same constructor outside of the BinaryTree class. – Nick Babcock Aug 17 '11 at 15:48

You have missed ; after both class declarations!

template <class T>
class BinaryTreeNode
{
private:
    BinaryTreeNode<T>* _left;
    BinaryTreeNode<T>* _right;
    T* _value;

public:
    BinaryTreeNode();
    explicit BinaryTreeNode(const T& value) : _value(&(T(value))) {}
    BinaryTreeNode(BinaryTreeNode<T>& left, BinaryTreeNode<T>& right, const T& value) :
        _left(&left), _right(&right), _value(&(T(value))){}
};

template <class T>
class BinaryTree
{
private:
    BinaryTreeNode<T>* _root;
    BinaryTreeNode<T>* _current;
    unsigned int size;

public:
    BinaryTree() : size(0), _root(0), _current(0) { }
    explicit BinaryTree(BinaryTree<T>& leftTree, BinaryTree<T>& rightTree, const T& value) : 
        size(leftTree.Size() + rightTree.Size() + 1), _root(leftTree.Root(), rightTree.Root(), value), _current(_root) {}
    explicit BinaryTree(const T& value) : size(1), _root(value) {}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Absentminded mistake from copying! Will fix original post. Good catch though ;) – Nick Babcock Aug 17 '11 at 14:33

I believe that you need a constructor in the form BinaryTree<T>();

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, not it, just tried it! The problem is from the explicit BinaryTree(BinaryTree<T>&, BinaryTree<T>&, const T&) constructor. Thanks for the suggestion. – Nick Babcock Aug 17 '11 at 14:27

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