Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I get from Effective C# Item 23 that the following code should print: MyDerivedMessage

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{

    interface IMsg
    {
        void message();
    }

    public class MyMessage : IMsg
    {
        public void message()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("MyMessage");
        }
    }

    public class MyDerivedMessage : MyMessage
    {
        public new void message()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("MyDerivedMessage");
        }
    }

    class Test
    {

        static void Main()
        {
            MyDerivedMessage mdm = new MyDerivedMessage();
            IMsg im = mdm as IMsg;
            im.message();
        }
    }
}

Book:

public class MyDerivedClass : MyClass
{
    public new void Message()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("MyDerivedClass");
    }
}

The addition of the IMsg keyword changes the behavior of your derived class so that IMsg.Message() now uses the derived class version:

MyDerivedClass d = new MyDerivedClass();
d.Message(); // prints "MyDerivedClass".
IMsg m = d as IMsg;
m.Message(); // prints " MyDerivedClass "

How come I still get MyMessage printed after I add "new" to MyDerivedMessage::message() ?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are hiding (or shadowing) the method rather than overriding it. This means that you will only call the method on the derived class when you access it from a variable declared to be that class (or more derived).

Note that this is the default on non-virtual methods, so adding "new" is just being more explicit.

If you don't want this behavior, you need to make the message method virtual in your base class, and override it in your derived class.

See also the documentation on new Modifier

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah the second part with virtual and override Ive done it, but I am confuse why the book says that it will print the derived message. –  vBx Aug 17 '11 at 14:28
    
I'm not familiar with that book, but the only two options are: 1) there is a mistake in the book, or 2) you misinterpreted that section of the book. If you used the same code as in the book and it claims that the output should be different, the book has a mistake. –  Philip Rieck Aug 17 '11 at 14:33
    
And yes, the book has a mistake - check the errata page for Effective c# here: billwagner.cloudapp.net/EffectiveCSharp It addresses the section you are reading. –  Philip Rieck Aug 17 '11 at 14:35
    
It's not the first mistake (typo) I've seen in a computer book, or book in general! –  JohnB Aug 17 '11 at 14:37
    
Thanks for pointing the mistake. So I am not crazy afterall :) –  vBx Aug 17 '11 at 14:38

It seems like maybe the book has some errata, but your MyDerivedMessage class would also need to implement IMsg. If this does not occur, then the cast to IMsg will only see MyMessage as having the Message() method when im.message() is called because of the chain created between the Interface and MyDerivedMessage.

MyDerivedMessage is-a MyMessage MyMessage is-a IMsg MyDerivedMessage NOT is-a IMsg

public class MyDerivedMessage : MyMessage, IMsg
{ 
    public new void message() 
    { 
        Console.WriteLine("MyDerivedMessage"); 
    } 
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.