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I want to extend the .NET's built-in Color struct to add new operators like + or -.
I will use them like:

Color c1 = Color.FromName("Red");
Color c2 = Color.FromName("Blue");
Color result = c2 - c1;

Is it possible? if yes, how?

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I'm not sure if this can be done but I am very curious as to what the result of 'red - blue' would be? –  n8wrl Aug 17 '11 at 15:07
1  
@n8wrl: Weird indeed, but I'd expect a - to remove whichever RGB values that color has from the other. –  Yuck Aug 17 '11 at 15:08
2  
@n8wrl whatever the opposite of purple is, presumably :-) –  Adam Houldsworth Aug 17 '11 at 15:08
1  
ok, everyone, forget about Color to avoid further confusion. it's a C# question after all :) tell if extending an existing struct with an operator is possible or not.. –  Can Poyrazoğlu Aug 17 '11 at 15:11
1  
@can No, it is not. –  asawyer Aug 17 '11 at 15:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no way to do it with the built in operators.

You could write an extension method to kind of fake it though:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static Color Substract(this Color color, Color theOtherColor)
    {
        //perform magic here! 
        //be sure to return something or this won't compile
    }
}

Color c1 = Color.FromName("Red");
Color c2 = Color.FromName("Blue");
Color result = c2.Subtract(c1);
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Your syntax is wrong for defining an extension method on Color. Has to be a static class with static methods. –  Yuck Aug 17 '11 at 15:10
    
I Just noticed i was missing the static modifiers. –  asawyer Aug 17 '11 at 15:11
1  
@asawyer, Remove return null. Color it's a value-type. –  Kirill Polishchuk Aug 17 '11 at 15:13
    
@Kirill Well it was only meant to express the idea, hence the comment about magic. –  asawyer Aug 17 '11 at 15:14

As others suggested, you can go either the extension methods way or the Decorator pattern way.

However, consider that Color has a fair number of properties and methods, so redirecting them all from the decorator class to your wrapped Color struct will mean writing a lot of boilerplate. If you go that route, however, you can indeed define operators and even implicit conversions from your class to Color and the other way around (so that you can use them more interchangeably), like this:

public class MyColor {
    public System.Drawing.Color val;

    public MyColor(System.Drawing.Color color)
    {
        this.val = color;
    }

    public static MyColor AliceBlue 
    {
        get {
            return new MyColor(System.Drawing.Color.AliceBlue);
        }
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return val.ToString();
    }
    // .... and so on....

    // User-defined conversion from MyColor to Color
    public static implicit operator System.Drawing.Color(MyColor c)
    {
        return c.val;
    }
    //  User-defined conversion from Color to MyColor
    public static implicit operator MyColor(System.Drawing.Color c)
    {
        return new MyColor(c);
    }
}

to test:

MyColor c = System.Drawing.Color.AliceBlue; // assigning a Color to a MyColor
                                            // thanks to the implicit conversion
Console.WriteLine(c.ToString()); // writes "Color [AliceBlue]"
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this is a really nice example for a reference, but (in my current situation) it'd just make everything harder. nice code though, implicit operators really clean up the things while writing code. –  Can Poyrazoğlu Aug 17 '11 at 15:37
1  
@can poyrazoğlu I agree. I would personally use extensions in your scenario: my example was more meant to show you what a mess the other way would become with a "big" struct like Color.... –  Paolo Falabella Aug 17 '11 at 15:41

Structs and Classes in C# share a lot of similarities, however one of several difference is that you cannot subclass a struct. You could use an extension method to implement an Add() or Subtract() method, but you cannot write an operator overload in an extension method.

If I were you and I really wanted to extend the functionality of an existing struct like this, I would wrap the struct in my own class.

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+1 It does seem like a strange place to use extension methods. –  Yuck Aug 17 '11 at 15:12

Look at extension methods.

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i know about extension methods, but just wondering the possibility of using operators. –  Can Poyrazoğlu Aug 17 '11 at 15:14
    
Than look at @iandotkelly answer. –  Kirill Polishchuk Aug 17 '11 at 15:17

I would say that these already exist, are you talking about redefining them? These are operations on the alpha and RGB of the colors. See below:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.media.color.op_subtraction.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.media.color.op_addition.aspx

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The Color object the OP is asking about exists in the System.Drawing namespace. Not the one you referenced. –  Yuck Aug 17 '11 at 15:18

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