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I am porting my VB6 installer to NSIS. Looking at the LST file, there is a section for bootstrapping files:

[Bootstrap Files]
File1=@VB6STKIT.DLL,$(WinSysPathSysFile),,,..........
File2=@COMCAT.DLL,$(WinSysPathSysFile),$(DLLSelfRegister),,......
File3=@STDOLE2.TLB,$(WinSysPathSysFile),$(TLBRegister),...........
File4=@ASYCFILT.DLL,$(WinSysPathSysFile),,,...........
File5=@OLEPRO32.DLL,$(WinSysPathSysFile),$(DLLSelfRegister),.........
File6=@OLEAUT32.DLL,$(WinSysPathSysFile),$(DLLSelfRegister),,........
File7=@msvbvm60.dll,$(WinSysPathSysFile),$(DLLSelfRegister),,...........
File8=@wshom.ocx,$(WinSysPath),$(DLLSelfRegister),$(Shared),.........

and another for setup1 files

[Setup1 Files]
File1=@drillcycles.pre,$(AppPath).......
File2=@twoz.pre,$(AppPath),.......

In another post, I was warned about distributing the wshom.ocx file (bootstrapping file), saying:

"That wshom.ocx is not meant to be distributed in this way. On downlevel versions of Windows this might succeed, only to break WSH and other scripting on the system. Do not redist this library like this. "

So, I was wondering if there are any considerations for distributing bootstrapping files? should I even distribute them?

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This warning is much more relevant to some of the other files you are installing. Windows can still run with a borked script interpreter but it can't survive when you accidentally oleaut32.dll or asyncfilt.dll. Which for one is why these files are protected from accidental overwriting by crummy installers, the Windows file system protection feature puts the correct one back immediately.

The odds that you'll actually run your installer on a machine that requires these files to be installed are zero. Windows 95 is gone. The odds that you'll install the wrong version of them if such a borked machine actually exists are very high. Which is one way to put it out of its prolonged misery.

As long as your installer has minimum counter measures in place to avoid replacing new DLLs with old copies with a simple version check then this isn't going to go wrong. Don't worry about it. Do consider that it is time that you stop relying on such ancient tools.

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So, I am not sure how to proceed. How can I know which files have to be included and which do not? –  Peretz Aug 17 '11 at 18:08
    
Also, I am also not sure what is the role of bootstrapping. is this section still aplicable if I want to distribute my application with another installer? Thanks. –  Peretz Aug 17 '11 at 18:09
    
You can buy installer packages that sort this out for you. Probably your best bet to rid yourself of the fud. InstallShield for example, not otherwise an endorsement. –  Hans Passant Aug 17 '11 at 18:15
    
Ok, I imagine NSIS already comes with something like this. I will check it out. Thanks –  Peretz Aug 17 '11 at 18:21
    
@Peretz: NSIS engine is self-contained, it does not need "bootstrapping" of any kind. P&DW setups needs VB6 runtime just to start installing the rest of the application i.e. bootstrapping. –  wqw Aug 17 '11 at 20:10

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