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I am trying to strongly type an object property that has been defined as an interface in an interface. Here is my sample

// interfaces
public interface IMyInterfaceA
{
    string A { get; set; }
    IMyInterfaceB B { get; set; }
}

public interface IMyInterfaceB
{
    string B { get; set; }
}

// POCOs
public class pocoOneB : IMyInterfaceB
{
    public B { get; set; }
    public C { get; set; }  // extending the poco with a non-interfaced property
}

public class pocoOneA : IMyInterfaceA
{
    string A { get; set; }
    pocoOneB B { get; set; }  // fails, can I strongly type an interface??
}

public class pocoTwoB : IMyInterfaceB
{
    public B { get; set; }
    public D { get; set; }  // extending the poco with a non-interfaced property
}

public class pocoTwoA : IMyInterfaceA
{
    string A { get; set; }
    pocoTwoB B { get; set; } // fails, can I strongly type an interface??
}

The problem is I can’t do

pocoOneB B { get; set; } // fails, can I strongly type an interface??

or

pocoTwoB B { get; set; } // fails, can I strongly type an interface??

even though they are implementations of the interface, the compiler says I didn’t correctly implement IMyInterfaceA on either poco. I understand the error, however I would like to know if there is a way to strongly type a property that has an interface?

One way around this is to not have the interface IMyInterfaceA define a property of interface IMyInterfaceB at all and extent on the poco’s, however I am trying to enforce the property is implemented using interfaces.

The main reason I need to strongly type the properties of the poco is because I am using JSON to desterilize over the wire.

Thank you for any guidance.

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What is the error message you get? –  i_am_jorf Aug 17 '11 at 15:52
    
Not sure if this will help or not, but if you right click on the interface in your class definition there is an option to implement the interface explicity. This defines the properties and methods of the interface as interface.property, might be worth a look –  WraithNath Aug 17 '11 at 15:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
public interface IMyInterfaceA<TPoco>
   where TPoco : IMyInterfaceB
{     
   TPoco B { get; set; } 
} 

public class pocoOneA<TPoco> : IMyInterfaceA<TPoco>
  where TPoco : IMyInterfaceB
{     
   public TPoco B { get; set; }  // fails, can I strongly type an interface?? 
} 

or simply

public interface IMyInterfaceA
{     
   IMyInterfaceB B { get; set; } 
} 

public class pocoOneA : IMyInterfaceA
{     
   public IMyInterfaceB B { get; set; }  // fails, can I strongly type an interface?? 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
@dlev : because I forgot to update an interface definition? (already updated). Or any an other problem you see? –  sll Aug 17 '11 at 16:00
    
The former. Looks fine now. –  dlev Aug 17 '11 at 16:02
    
@dlev : ok thanks for pointing to this! –  sll Aug 17 '11 at 16:02
    
@sllev, the generic interface is perfect! thanks! –  Jason Lavigne Aug 17 '11 at 16:34
    
@Jason Lavigne : cool stuff! –  sll Aug 17 '11 at 16:37
public interface IMyInterfaceA
{
    string A { get; set; }
    IMyInterfaceB B { get; set; }
}

Your interface has IMyInterfaceB B, so you have to have the same signature in the class.

public class pocoOneA : IMyInterfaceA
{
    string A { get; set; }
    IMyInterfaceB B { get; set; }  // fails, can I strongly type an interface??
}

But when you return the object you can return either pocoOneB or pocoTwoB

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I am trying to avoid, defining the property as 'IMyInterfaceB B' because if I try and desterilize using JSON, the serializer does not know which poco to use. This is why I want to strongly type my poco’s that have an interface defined on a property. –  Jason Lavigne Aug 17 '11 at 16:00
    
Using generic parameter (see my answer) you can instantiate it passing concrete type like new PocoA<PocoB>(pocoBInstance); so deserializer would know which type any way using instance of pocoB (event you are using it without generic parameter because any way pocoA has an instance of pocoB). To be more clear I need to see how you are deserializing these pocos? –  sll Aug 17 '11 at 16:05

You shouldn't need to "strongly type" the property - the interface IMyInterfaceB should provide all the information needed for a consumer of IMyInterfaceA to work with. What you can do is back your property with an instance of the type MyInterfaceB:

private MyInterfaceB _myInterfaceB;

public IMyInterfaceB
{
    get { return _myInterfaceB; }
    set { _myInterfaceB = (MyInterfaceB)value; }
}
share|improve this answer

What you want is covariant return types. IIRC it never made it into C# - at least in this form.

You can simulate it by implementing the interface explicitly and supplying a new property in the derived type for the strongly typed return value.

I'm not sure how this plays with your serialisation, though.

// interfaces
public interface IMyInterfaceA
{
    string A { get; set; }
    IMyInterfaceB B { get; set; }
}

public interface IMyInterfaceB
{
    string B { get; set; }
}

// POCOs
public class pocoOneB : IMyInterfaceB
{
    public string B { get; set; }
    public string C { get; set; }  // extending the poco with a non-interfaced property
}

public class pocoOneA : IMyInterfaceA
{
    public string A { get; set; }
    IMyInterfaceB IMyInterfaceA.B{ get; set; }
    public pocoOneB B { get{ return new pocoOneB(); } set{} }  // fails, can I strongly type an interface??
}

public class pocoTwoB : IMyInterfaceB
{
    public string  B { get; set; }
    public string D { get; set; }  // extending the poco with a non-interfaced property
}

public class pocoTwoA : IMyInterfaceA
{
    public string A { get; set; }
    IMyInterfaceB IMyInterfaceA.B{ get; set; }
    public pocoOneB B { get{ return new pocoOneB(); } set{} }  // fails, can I strongly type an interface??
}
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