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Normally, this would be incredibly easy with tables, but everyone says tables are bad now days. Most of my web forms will be something like this:

[label] [textbox]

[label] [textbox]

[label] [combobox] [textbox]

I just want everything to line up neatly.

*Edit: To clarify, I'm not using tables for the layout of my webforms. That is done using CSS. However, from some comments, it seems that tables are okay for lining up my controls. I think that may be the best solution...

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1  
Have a look at the related questions list on the right - there are many similar questions. –  M4N Aug 17 '11 at 16:12
    
@Wesley, too funny! :) +1 –  IrishChieftain Aug 17 '11 at 16:25
    
There is nothing wrong with using tables for tabular data. This is not tabular data. Tables are always wrong for page layout. What you are trying to do is equally, incredibly easy using CSS. –  Rob Aug 17 '11 at 16:29
2  
@Rob Then show us your increadibly easy css for creating a form like this, please! –  Fabian Barney Aug 17 '11 at 16:39
1  
Meh. Ignore the whiners. Do what is incredibly easy and then spend your time working the incredibly hard part. –  james.garriss Aug 17 '11 at 16:47
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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I've only tested in FF6 and Chrome, but here's one way to do it.

http://jsfiddle.net/e7T3g/3/

Note that the first one is your image. Yes, this is not 100% perfect and will need to be tested and tweaked, but just wanted to show you that creating this layout with CSS is not a dream.

(One reason) Why this is better than using tables:

If you look at the markup, there's nothing that suggests layout at all, everything is semantic and uses classes. If one day you want to completely change how the layout looks, it's all in your CSS file. Using tables, you'll have to wade through tons of tedious <tr>s and <td>s in your HTML file and your CSS file to make a change. Likewise, if you want to make one small change, you aren't restricted by the table markup, which is very hard to work with.

The quick 'n dirty:

<form>
    <div class="address">
        <label>Address</label><input>
    </div>
    <div class="city">
        <label>City</label><input>
    </div>
    <div class="state">
        <label>State</label>
        <select>
            <option></option>
            <option>___</option>
            <option>___</option>
        </select>
    </div>
    <div class="zip">
        <label>Zip</label>
        <input>
    </div>
    <div class="archive">
        <label>Archive Location</label>
        <input type="checkbox">
    </div>
</form>
input {
    padding:3px;   
}
label:after {
    content:":";   
}
form {
    background:#888;
    padding:15px 25px 10px 15px;
    width:470px;
    float:left;
    font:900 13px serif;
}
.archive,
.address {
    float:left;
    width:100%;  
    margin-bottom:3px;
}

.archive label,
.city label,
.address label {
    width:100px;
    text-align:right;
    float:left;
}
.address input {
    width:360px;
}
.zip input {
    width:70px;   
}
.address,
.zip {
    float:right;   
}
.city,
.state {
    float:left;  
    margin-right:8px;
}
.archive {
    margin-top:5px;   
}

There's a million ways to do this layout, (and it's not a complete HTML fragment yet, we're missing some required attributes) and I'm sure I could come up with an better version, but I'll leave that as an exercise to you as you continue to learn CSS.

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+1 excellent answer :) –  IrishChieftain Aug 17 '11 at 17:12
    
Would you call it easier than using tables or not? It's a serious question. In my opinion this is much harder to read and write than a table-based layout for this form. But maybe it's just because it's me. +1 though for the first one posting code here –  Fabian Barney Aug 17 '11 at 17:16
    
@Fatal: Which part is hard to read or write for you, the HTML or CSS? Keep in mind, if we were doing a real website we'd have some sort of CSS framework set up for this, and also that this was just a quick hack-together. Remember that CSS is for styling HTML, while HTML is for describing what the content is. –  Wesley Murch Aug 17 '11 at 17:18
    
IE8 is a bit off on the zip code input - but like I said - it's not a full solution, just a demo of what is possible. This layout is foolishly relying on some things like text width, but we could really make this awesome and IE-proof if we wanted to. –  Wesley Murch Aug 17 '11 at 17:23
    
@Wesley Murch It's hard to get this HTML and CSS code together in mind. When I read a table-based layout I can imagine how it will look like without rendering it. This is much harder with the code you posted. These floats, clears, label:after, content:":" and so on... And I am sure it's harder to maintain as long as there is no framework doing the "hard work" for you. –  Fabian Barney Aug 17 '11 at 17:48
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Check out this tutorial:

http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2006/11/11/css-based-forms-modern-solutions/

You could use tables for forms but I prefer to use CSS because it is more maintainable and performant. Strictly speaking, tables should be used only for "tabular data" and this does not exactly describe form fields...

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Depends on the definition of quote tabular data. webdesign.about.com/od/tables/a/aa122605.htm I don't think about.com is gospel, but "If you're going to have header fields at the top of columns of data or to the left of rows of data, then it is tabular and a table should be used." seems to apply to a form with headings. –  Jim Aug 17 '11 at 17:18
    
Still a moot point: tables take from SEO and semantic HTML just to mention a couple of reasons for avoiding it. Performance is another and this becomes even more critical now that mobile access has surpassed desktop browser access... –  IrishChieftain Aug 17 '11 at 17:21
    
Performance is a good reason, but if the data truly is "tabular data" then a table is perfectly semantic. –  Jim Aug 17 '11 at 17:24
    
I'll grant you that... but I still would not opt to create forms with tables as it's just too messy :) –  IrishChieftain Aug 17 '11 at 17:27
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Using the power of ems, p tags, and modular CSS:

HTML:

<form action="post" class="dummyForm" method="./" onsubmit="return false;">
    <fieldset class="formContainer">
        <legend class="formDescription">Form styling made easy!</legend>
        <p class="formElementWrapper">
            <label class="leftLabel formLabel" for="address">Address:&nbsp;</label>
            <input class="formElement orphanElement" id="address" name="address" type="text">
        </p>
        <p class="formElementWrapper">
            <label class="leftLabel formLabel" for="city">City:&nbsp;</label>
            <input class="cityInput formElement" id="city" name="city" type="text">
            <label class="formLabel" for="state">State:&nbsp;</label>
            <select class="formElement stateSelect" id="state" name="state">
                <option value="HI">HI</option>
            </select>
            <label class="formLabel" for="zip">Zip:&nbsp;</label>
            <input class="zipInput formElement" id="zip" name="zip "type="text">
        </p>
        <p class="formElementWrapper">
            <label class="leftLabel formLabel" for="archive">Archive Location:&nbsp;</label>
            <input class="formElement" id="archive" name="archive" type="checkbox">
        </p>
    </fieldset>
</form>

CSS:

form.dummyForm
{
    width: 40em;
    background-color: #999999;
    font-family: Times New Roman, serif;
    font-size: .8em;
    font-weight: bold;
}
legend.formDescription, fieldset.formContainer, form.dummyForm
{
    border: none;
}
label.formLabel
{
    width: auto;
    padding-top: .1em;
    float: left;
    clear: right;
}
label.leftLabel
{
    width: 9em;
    text-align: right;
}
input.formElement, select.formElement, textarea.formElement
{
    margin-right: .5em;
    float: left;
    clear: right;
    display: inline;
}
input.cityInput
{
    width: 9em;
}
select.stateSelect
{
    width: 4em;
}
input.zipInput
{
    width: 5em;
}
input.orphanElement, select.orphanElement, textarea.orphanElement
{
    width: 25em;
    float: left;
    clear: right;
}
p.formElementWrapper
{
    padding: .5em;
}

Demo: http://www.fortybelow.ca/hosted/misc/ieforms/


As a bonus, here's the form in various builds of IE:

IE 6:

IE 6

IE:Mac (an infamously terrible and dated browser):

IE:Mac

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1  
Nice work, this looks like something that could be used in production, mine was slammed together as fast as I could to quell the table proponents. This is a good example. –  Wesley Murch Aug 17 '11 at 18:12
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Per your EDIT, no, tables still are not for layout just because it's a form. Your inputs are still not tabular data. You can wrap the whole thing in a div and style each input element as needed. See the Smashing link in the other answer for some examples.

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Bleh. Looking at the Smashing article examples, most of them suck, and I'm leaving for a few hours. If no one else creates a fiddle for his example, I'll do one tonight. –  Rob Aug 17 '11 at 16:44
    
When it is incredibly easy css why not posting some code snippets then? My experience is another: It is horrible doing things like this with pure CSS and it is less maintainable. But I'll change my mind when some really easy CSS comes out here for styling this form ... –  Fabian Barney Aug 17 '11 at 16:45
    
@Fatal - see my comment. –  Rob Aug 17 '11 at 16:47
    
Ok, but with tables it's about minutes to create something like that. Seems so there is more to do with CSS-styled form. Anyway, I stay tuned. :-) –  Fabian Barney Aug 17 '11 at 16:49
    
@Fatal - Back sooner than expected but you're getting plenty of examples. –  Rob Aug 17 '11 at 18:59
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