Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an extension method like this one :

      public static void ImplementsAttribute<TX, TY>(this Expression<Func<TY>> expression) 
     where TX : Coupling.PropertiesMergerAttribute
  {
     var memberExpression = expression.Body as MemberExpression;
     var name = MetaHelper.GetPropertyName(expression);
     var property = memberExpression.Expression.Type.GetProperty(name);
     var attributes = property.GetCustomAttributes(true);
     Assert.IsTrue(attributes.Any(a => a is TX));
  }

I can actually use my code like this :

     Expression<Func<String>> nameProperty = () => new ImprovisedExplosiveXML().Name;
     nameProperty.ImplementsAttribute<Coupling.UnresolvablePropertiesMergerAttribute, String>();

but I would like to not need to specify the second generic parameter type :

     Expression<Func<String>> nameProperty = () => new ImprovisedExplosiveXML().Name;
     nameProperty.ImplementsAttribute<Coupling.UnresolvablePropertiesMergerAttribute>();

Is there a way of doing this in C# 3.5 ?

share|improve this question
    
based on the code you have given, i could see you need to either pass the TY as a template parameter or as the Argument to ur extension method. –  ioWint Aug 17 '11 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

C# does not support partial generic inference. If the compiler can't determine all the types you have to supply them all yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. I realised that I didn't need the type of the parameter at compile-time so I juste replaced the Expression<Func<TY>> by <Expression<Func<object>> and it does work well for my usage. –  Soath Aug 17 '11 at 18:28

You can do something like this:

public class AttributeTester
{
    public Attribute[] Attributes { get; set; }

    public void ImplementsAttribute<TAttType>()
    {
         Assert.IsTrue(Attributes.Any(x => x is TAttType));
    }
}

public static void ForProperty<TType, TProperty>(this TType obj, Expression<Func<TType, TProperty>> expression)
{
     var memberExpression = expression.Body as MemberExpression;
     var name = MetaHelper.GetPropertyName(expression);
     var property = memberExpression.Expression.Type.GetProperty(name);
     return new AttributeTester { Attributes = property.GetCustomAttributes(true) };
}

Then, you should be able to just write it like so:

new ImproveisedExplosiveXML().ForProperty(x => x.Name).ImplementsAttribute<SomeAttribute>();
share|improve this answer
    
? I do not understand. I need to look if a property is binded with an attribute. On the last line you suggested me, there is no def. for TX, wich is the attribute I want to look for in the property : Assert.IsTrue(attributes.Any(a => a is TX)); –  Soath Aug 17 '11 at 20:30
    
Sorry, I forgot to specify the attribute in a methiod. One second... –  Tejs Aug 17 '11 at 20:32
    
Updated with new method and class –  Tejs Aug 17 '11 at 20:35
    
Thanks for your answer ! it would work but I can't work with .NET 4, and the AttributeInfo seems to be exclusive to .NET 4 ? is there any workaround ? –  Soath Aug 17 '11 at 20:43
    
Sorry, I'm getting ahead of myself. I really should check this answer in a compiler =D The Attributes property should be the result of the property.GetCustomAttributes(true) call; in this case I believe it returns Attribute[]. –  Tejs Aug 17 '11 at 20:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.