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Does the virtual qualifier to a virtual function of base class, in the derived class makes any difference ?

class b
{
   public:
   virtual void foo(){}
};

class d : public b
{
  public:
  void foo(){ .... }
};

or

class d : public b
{
  public:
  virtual void foo(){ .... }
}; 

Is there any difference in these two declarations, apart from that it makes child of d make aware of virtuality of foo() ?

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afaik, it makes a difference if something else derives from class d –  K Mehta Aug 17 '11 at 19:05
    
@Kshitij: No, even then it doesn't make any difference. Once foo is virtual, its virtual forever, no matter how far you go from the base in the class-hierarchy. –  Nawaz Aug 17 '11 at 19:12

4 Answers 4

It makes no difference. foo is virtual in all classes that derive from b (and their descendants).

From C++03 standard, §10.3.2:

If a virtual member function vf is declared in a class Base and in a class Derived, derived directly or indirectly from Base, a member function vf with the same name and same parameter list as Base::vf is declared, then Derived::vf is also virtual (whether or not it is so declared) and it overrides Base::vf.

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No difference - it's a virtual override either way.

It's a matter of style and has been definitively discussed here

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It's better style to include the virtual keyword. But it's not required.

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No difference.

Once foo is virtual, its virtual forever in the class-hierarchy, no matter how far you go from the base in the class-hierarchy.

But I prefer to write virtual even in overrridden functions, because it adds readability to the code, which matters a lot.

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For extra safety C++11 adds some override keyword which you can specify, so the compiler checks for you that when overriding a virtual function, you did not make a mistake in the signature and overloaded it accidentally –  PlasmaHH Aug 17 '11 at 19:13

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