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I understand why ActiveRecord can't support has_many :through on polymorphic classes. But I would like to emulate some of its functionality. Consider the following, where a join table associates two polymorphic classes:

class HostPest < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :host, :polymorphic => true
  belongs_to :pest, :polymorphic => true
end
class Host < ActiveRecord::Base
  self.abstract_class = true  
  has_many :host_pests, :as => :host
end
class Pest < ActiveRecord::Base
  self.abstract_class = true  
  has_one :host_pest, :as => :pest
end
class Dog < Host ; end
class Cat < Host ; end
class Flea < Pest ; end
class Tick < Pest ; end

The goal

Since I can't do has_many :pests, :through=>:host_pests, :as=>:host (etc), I'd like to emulate these four methods:

dog.pests (returns a list of pests associated with this dog)
flea.host (return the host associated with this flea)
cat.pests << Tick.create (creates a HostPest record)
tick.host = Cat.create (creates a HostPest record)

Question 1

I've got a working implementation for the first two methods (pests and host), but want to know if this is the best way (specifically, am I overlooking something in ActiveRecord associations that would help):

class Host < ActiveRecord::Base
  def pests
    HostPest.where(:host_id => self.id, :host_type => self.class).map {|hp| hp.pest}
  end
end
class Pest < ActiveRecord::Base
  def host
    HostPest.where(:pest_id => self.id, :pest_type => self.class).first.host
  end
end

Question 2

I'm stumped on how to implement the << and = methods implied here:

cat.pests << Tick.create  # => HostPest(:host=>cat, :pest=>tick).create
tick.host = Cat.create    # => HostPest(:host=>cat, :pest=>tick).create

Any suggestions? (And again, can ActiveRecord associations provide any help?)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Implementing the host= method on the Pest class is straight forward. We need to make sure we clear the old host while setting a new host (as AR doesn't clear the old value from the intermediary table.).

class Pest < ActiveRecord::Base
  self.abstract_class = true  
  has_one :host_pest, :as => :pest

  def host=(host)
    Pest.transaction do
      host_pest.try(:destroy) # destroy the current setting if any
      create_host_pest(:host => host)
    end
  end
end

Implementing pests<< method on Host class is bit more involved. Add the pests method on the Host class to return the aggregated list of pests. Add the << method on the object returned by pests method.

class Host < ActiveRecord::Base
  self.abstract_class = true  
  has_many :host_pests, :as => :host

  # pest list accessor
  def pests
    @pests ||= begin
      host = self # variable to hold the current self. 
                  # We need it later in the block
      list = pest_list
      # declare << method on the pests list
      list.singleton_class.send(:define_method, "<<") do |pest|
        # host variable accessible in the block 
        host.host_pests.create(:pest => pest)
      end
      list
    end        
  end

private
  def pest_list
    # put your pest concatenation code here
  end
end

Now

cat.pests # returns a list
cat.pests << flea # appends the flea to the pest list
share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Kandada -- close, I think, but 'pests<<(pest)' is a syntax error, at least in Ruby 1.9. I think you meant pests.<< (i.e. a singleton instance, right), but then you need an instance to act on. And my confusion on how to get that led me to retract my own answer. –  fearless_fool Aug 18 '11 at 23:39
1  
I have updated the answer. Take a look. Solution should work. I have tested it using a comparable scenario. This problem was interesting. –  Harish Shetty Aug 19 '11 at 1:54
    
That's it! Now I understand (better) the zen of singleton methods. [There's minor problem in host= -- you probably want host_pest.destroy if host_pest.exists?] Kudos for the answer, double kudos for your perseverance. Thank you. –  fearless_fool Aug 19 '11 at 18:47
    
I have updated the answer with a better method to checking the existence of host_pest. –  Harish Shetty Aug 19 '11 at 18:56

You can address your problem by using STI and regular association:

class HostPest < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :host
  belongs_to :pest
end

Store all the hosts in a table called hosts. Add a string column called type to the table.

class Host < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :host_pests
  has_many :pests, :through => :host_pests
end

Inherit the Host class to create new hosts.

class Dog < Host ; end
class Cat < Host ; end

Store all the pests in a table called pests. Add a string column called type to the table.

class Pest < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_one :host_pest
  has_one :host, :through => :host_pest
end

Inherit the Pest class to create new pests.

class Flea < Pest ; end
class Tick < Pest ; end

Now when you can run following commands:

dog.pests (returns a list of pests associated with this dog)
flea.host (return the host associated with this flea)
cat.pests << Tick.create (creates a HostPest record)
tick.host = Cat.create (creates a HostPest record)

Note

Rails supports has_many :through on polymorphic classes. You need to specify the source_type for this to work.

Consider the models for tagging:

class Tag
  has_many :tag_links
end

class TagLink
  belongs_to :tag
  belongs_to :tagger, :polymorphic => true
end

Let's say products and companies can be tagged.

class Product
  has_many :tag_links, :as => :tagger
  has_many :tags, :through => :tag_links
end

class Company
  has_many :tag_links, :as => :tagger
  has_many :tags, :through => :tag_links
end

We can add an association on Tag model to get all the tagged products as follows:

class Tag
  has_many :tag_links
  has_many :products, :through => :tag_links, 
                        :source => :tagger, :source_type => 'Product'
end
share|improve this answer
    
First +1 for a well written and clear response. But: "You can address your problem by using STI and regular association" if and only if all hosts and all pests are homogeneous. But in my case, cats and dogs (and fleas and ticks) have different attributes, ergo I need polymorhism, not STI. And I would be happy to use source_type, but AFAIK that requires naming all the polymorphic classes you want to use a priori. I suppose some metaprogramming hack could collect all the classes and generate all the source_type clauses automagically. Let me mull on that a bit. –  fearless_fool Aug 18 '11 at 7:00
    
In this scenario, I would use dynamic attributes(github.com/99tests/dynamic-attributes) to store custom attributes specific to a STI class. This would allow you to store any number of class specific attributes with out altering the underlying table. This approach doesn't work very well when you have to query the models using dynamic attributes. –  Harish Shetty Aug 18 '11 at 7:21
    
Something like dynamic attributes would work if I can embody all the class-specific attributes in a YAML-fied text field. Though to be honest, I'd probably just use :serializable. –  fearless_fool Aug 18 '11 at 13:58
    
Mostly by this point I'm hoping to see an answer to "Question 2" above! –  fearless_fool Aug 18 '11 at 14:01
    
Dynamic attribute is virtually same as a regular attribute. You get to set/get/validate them like a regular attribute. They are stored like a :serializable object. –  Harish Shetty Aug 18 '11 at 15:53

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