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Here is a code snippet where I am opening a file for writing with two FileOutputStreams at the same time.

FileOutputStream fis = null;
File openFile = new File("myfile");
try {
    fis = new FileOutputStream(openFile);
    Toast toast = Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "Opened", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
    toast.show();
}
catch (FileNotFoundException e1) {
    Toast toast = Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "FileNotFound", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
    toast.show();
}

// now try to open it again
FileOutputStream fis2 = null;
try {
    fis2 = new FileOutputStream(openFile);
    Toast toast = Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "Opened2", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
    toast.show();
}
catch (Exception e1) {
    Toast toast = Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "Exception: " + e1.getMessage(), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
    toast.show();
}

I end up getting two Toast messages, "Opened" and "Opened2".

I need to make sure I don't open a file for reading/writing/deleting that is currently open for writing by another instance. How to I ensure I do not modify a file that is currently open for writing?

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3 Answers 3

I need to make sure I don't open a file for reading/writing/deleting that is currently open for writing by another instance.

What do you mean by another instance?

  • If this is another thread in your application use the synchronization for read/write methods.
  • If this is another process created by yourself (application, service etc.) use exclusive FileLock to coordinate file read/write operations between processes.
  • If this is another process you don't control (i.e. created by someone else) you can check whether file is currently opened by inspecting /proc/…/fd/ tree, as lsof utility does. However this usually requires you to have root privileges.

Hope that give you a clue. Let me know if you need further assistance.

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2  
+1 for info about lsof utility - it helped in my case –  ol0 Apr 22 '13 at 6:24
    
Isn't there a way to say "I'm about to read that file, please make sure other processes cannot write it until I'm done" ? I'm using a SharedPreferences and they get lost after a while, but I can't use FileLock for them when using Android API. –  3c71 Mar 24 at 10:45

You could just perform a null check

if (null == fis)
// then create output stream

If fis was opened earlier, it wouldn't be null, and you wouldn't end up opening another output stream.

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FileObserver might help you.

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Having 2 processes (same app) read the same preference file, I tried using FileObserver to reload preferences. Turns out this is completely unreliable (didn't find out why) and one process didn't reload preferences after it was modified by another! Even thought I made sure the observer was kept alive. –  3c71 Mar 24 at 10:43

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