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I am using XSLT to transform some provisioning XML into a SOAP request. But I am having difficulties finding an approach that does not require full XPATH expressions and still generates valid SOAP XML.

Here is a simplified version of the provisioning XML.

<CreateOrder>
    <client_info>
        <name>John Doe</name>
        <address>
            <street1>1211 Lakeview Dr.</street1>
            <city>New York</city>
            <state>NY</state>
            <country>USA</country>
            <zip>12345</zip>
        </address>
    </client_info>
    <subscriber_number>AAANNNDDDD</subscriber_number>
</CreateOrder>

And here is the simplified XSLT I am using.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">
    <xsl:output method="xml" />
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <soapenv:Envelope xmlns:soapenv="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
            <soapenv:Header/>
            <soapenv:Body>
                <DirectoryNumber><xsl:value-of select="CreateOrder/subscriber_number"/></DirectoryNumber>
                <Locale>
                    <xsl:choose>
                        <xsl:when test="CreateOrder/client_info/address/country = 'USA'">
                            <xsl:text>English (US)</xsl:text>
                        </xsl:when>
                        <xsl:otherwise>
                            <xsl:text>User Defined 1</xsl:text>
                        </xsl:otherwise>
                    </xsl:choose>
                </Locale>
            </soapenv:Body>
        </soapenv:Envelope>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

This generates the following XML output - which is what I expected / want. [Note that I had to pretty printed this - my output is actually just a single line wth no line breaks / indents.]

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<soapenv:Envelope xmlns:soapenv="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
    <soapenv:Header/>
    <soapenv:Body>
        <DirectoryNumber>
            AAANNNDDDD
        </DirectoryNumber>
        <Locale>
            English (US)
        </Locale>
    </soapenv:Body>
</soapenv:Envelope>

By playing around, it appears that I need to use <xsl:template match="/"> to match the whole input document, or else I do not get the SOAP XML into the output. Is there some other way of generating a sequence of new XML from the XSLT?

But when the <xsl:template match="/"> is present, I can't nest other <xsl:template match=..."> elements (for example to match "address") and so have to use full XPATH node expressions (such as CreateOrder/client_info/address/country) in the tests. This works but is not particularly elegant, and is somewhat error prone for a real world longer example. Is there a better way of doing this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Templates don't nest. You achieve what you want with <xsl:apply-templates.../> at the appropriate places in your templates. In your simple example there's no getting around having to specify the path, but in a larger, more complex stylesheet you could have many reusable templates.

<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">

  <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>
  <xsl:template match="/">
    <soapenv:Envelope xmlns:soapenv="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
      <soapenv:Header/>
      <soapenv:Body>
        <DirectoryNumber><xsl:value-of select="CreateOrder/subscriber_number"/></DirectoryNumber>
        <Locale>
          <xsl:apply-templates select="CreateOrder/client_info/address/country"/>
        </Locale>
      </soapenv:Body>
    </soapenv:Envelope>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="country">
    <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test=". = 'USA'">
        <xsl:text>English (US)</xsl:text>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:text>User Defined 1</xsl:text>
      </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

The key to understanding XSLT is to realize that it's not procedural... your stylesheet is NOT in control. Instead, the XSLT processor is examining each input tag and then searching the stylesheet for a matching template. Once a matching rule is found and applied, processing for that tag is done. If you match /, then the entire document is consumed by that one template. The only way other templates can be invoked is through <xsl:apply-templates select="some xpath"/> which tells the processor to restart the matching process using the nodes selected by "some xpath". It is extremely common for the first template in a stylesheet to match /.

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Thanks Jim. Being pretty new to XSLT I was worrying that I'd missed something and/or there was a better way to do what I'm doing. So receiving a carefully explained "that's what you do" answer really helped. And I will start using the apply-templates construct to make the code cleaner / more modular. –  Torid Aug 17 '11 at 23:10
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