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I'm new to JQuery, and Javascript, and I am using the JQueryUI ProgressBar, and every time somebody clicks on a button, then the progress bar animates and fills up. Is there a way to keep track of which buttons are already pressed to prevent the buttons from triggering the event again?

Current HTML:

   <ul>
     <li><a href="left/section1.html" target="leftcontainer" onClick="updateBar();window.presentation.location.href='right/section1/page1.html';;return true;">overview</a></li> 
     <li><a href="left/section2.html" target="leftcontainer" onClick="updateBar();window.presentation.location.href='right/section1/page1.html';;return true;">key features</a></li>
     <li><a href="#" onClick="updateBar()">customers</a></li>
     <li><a href="#" onClick="updateBar()">accessories</a></li>
     <!--<li><a href="#">nav5</a></li>
     <li><a href="#">nav6</a></li> -->
    </ul>

Current JQuery/JavaScript:

var percentage = 0;                                                     

function updateBar() 
{
    percentage += 25;                                                               
    $('.ui-progressbar-value').stop().animate({ width: percentage+"%" }, 500)       
    $('.middle').progressbar('option','value', percentage);                         

    if(percentage > 100)                                                            
    {
        $('ui-progressbar-value').stop().animate({ width: "100%"}, 500);            
    }
}

$(function() {
    $('.middle').progressbar({                                          
        value: percentage,                                              
        complete: function() { alert('The progress bar is full'); }     
    });
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would bind the click event in the JavaScript and use the jQuery .one() method.

documentation

Basically the one method allows you to bind an event that can only be triggered once, such as a click event.

Live Demo

var percentage = 0;                                                     

$('ul li a').one('click', updateBar);

function updateBar() 
{
    percentage += 25;                                                               
    $('#test').text(percentage);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That worked like a charm, simple and to the point. I'll have to dig around in the JQuery documentation some more. Thanks a lot! :D –  listao Aug 18 '11 at 2:32
    
After the page has been refreshed/reloaded, the user can once again call the function. Is there any way to restrict this. I'm asking because this function is called in an iframe page and that page is refreshed when the user clicks a link, negating the one time call. Any ideas? –  listao Aug 18 '11 at 15:45
    
If the page is reloaded the JS will be reloaded :? You could try reloading the page with a parameter like page.html?perc=25, so on reload it knows the percentage is already at 25%. Or pass on the elements that have been clicked via page parameters. Then you would have to parse the url parameters on page load and disable the links. Thats a whole other issue altogether though. –  Loktar Aug 18 '11 at 15:49

HTML (add a class):

 <li><a href="#" class='clickable'>customers</a></li>
 <li><a href="#" class='clickable'>accessories</a></li>

JS

var percentage = 0;                                                     

$(function() {
    $('.clickable').click(function updateBar(){
        $(this).unbind('click'); //dont allow click again
        percentage += 25;                                                               
        $('.ui-progressbar-value').stop().animate({ width: percentage+"%" }, 500);       
        $('.middle').progressbar('option','value', percentage);                         

       if(percentage > 100)                                                            
       {
           $('ui-progressbar-value').stop().animate({ width: "100%"}, 500);            
       }
    });

    $('.middle').progressbar({                                          
        value: percentage,                                              
        complete: function() { alert('The progress bar is full'); }     
    });
 });
share|improve this answer
    
This worked well except that it restricted me from actually re-clicking the button, which I actually needed to do. But, I loved the generalization that it had so it can be applied to any element. –  listao Aug 18 '11 at 2:33

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