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I need to traverse a tree quickly, and I would like to do it in parallel. I'd rather use the parallel extensions than manually spin up a bunch of threads.

My current code looks something like this:

   public void Traverse(Node root)
    {
        var nodeQueue = new Queue<Node>();
        nodeQueue.Enqueue(root);
        while (nodeQueue.Count!=0)
        {
            var node = nodeQueue.Dequeue();
            if (node.Property = someValue) DoSomething(node);
            foreach (var node in node.Children)
            {
                nodeQueue.Enqueue(node);
            }
        }
    }

I was really hoping that Parallel.ForEach had a Parallel.While analog. I came across Stephen Toub's article on Implementing Parallel While with Parallel.ForEach. If read it correctly this still won't work because I am mutating the queue I am trying to iterate.

Do I need to use a task factory and recursion (and is that risky?) ? or is there some simple solution I am overlooking?

Edit: @svick

The tree has just over 250,000 nodes. The maximum depth right now is 14 nodes deep including the root.

There are about 500 nodes off the root, and the balance after that has a fairly random distribution. I'll get some better stats on the distribution soon.

@Enigmativity:

Yes, the tree is being modified, concurrently by many users, but I will usually have a shared read lock for the tree or sub tree, or allow for dirty reads.

Calls to node.Children can be considered atomic.

DoSomething is really one of several delegates, for some expensive operations I will probably gather a snapshot list of nodes and process them outside the traversal.

I realized that I should probably look at the general case (a sub-tree being traversed instead of the entire tree.) To that end I ran traverse on every node of the tree and looked at the total time.

I used a Parallel.ForEach(nodes, Traverse) for each traversal algorithm, where nodes contained all ~250k nodes. This simulated (sort of) a lot of users simultaneously requesting a lot of different nodes.

00256ms Breadth First Sequential

00323ms Breadth First Sequential with work (i incremented a static counter as "work")

01495ms Kirks First answer

01143ms Svicks Second answer

00000ms Recursive Single Threaded didn't finish after 60s

00000ms Enigmativity's answer didn't finish after 60s

@Enigma, I think it's possible I might have messed up your alogrithm somehow, because it seems like it should be much quicker.

The results surprised me to say the least. I had to add some work to the breadth first sequential just to convince myself that the compiler wasn't magically optimizing away the traversals.

For the single traversal of the head, parallelizing the first level only had the best performance. But just barely, this number improved as I added more nodes to the second level (2000 instead of 500).

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1  
I'm not sure parallelizing this is a good idea. It makes sense if you know exactly how many iterations you'll need at the very beginning. Here, you won't necessarily know how many iterations will be needed until you visit the children. A simple producer/consumer should be sufficient IMO. –  Jeff Mercado Aug 17 '11 at 21:38
    
@Jeff, why would parallelization only made sense if you knew the count of iterations exactly? –  svick Aug 17 '11 at 23:07
    
@Jason, what can you tell us about the shape of the tree? What is its maximum depth? Is it balanced? How wide many children each node has? –  svick Aug 17 '11 at 23:13
    
@svick: Well when you start traversing a tree, you have access to only one node, the root. You won't know and cannot access the other nodes until you actually visit the node. So it's weird to me to say that one would want to parallelize traversing a single node. It's more natural for me to look at it as coming up with a list of nodes to visit. When a node is visited, add the children to the list and continue until all found nodes in the list have been visited. This is where the producer/consumer pattern makes sense to me where all threads are both producer and consumer. –  Jeff Mercado Aug 17 '11 at 23:20
    
@Jeff, obviously you can't parallelize traversing one node, but traversing the whole tree, makes perfect sense. And if you mean you'll have multiple producer/consumer threads, then that is a way of parallelizing the code. –  svick Aug 17 '11 at 23:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The most direct way would be to create a Task for each child node and then wait for all of them:

public void Traverse(Node root)
{
    if (node.Property == someValue)
        DoSomething(node);

    var tasks = new List<Task>();

    foreach (var node in node.Children)
    {
        // tmp is necessary because of the way closures close over loop variables
        var tmp = node;
        tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Traverse(tmp)));
    }

    Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
}

Task is fairly light-weight, so creating lots of them works reasonably well. But they do have some overhead, so doing something more complicated like having a few tasks that share a queue is probably going to be faster. If that's the way you're going to go, don't forget that empty queue doesn't mean all work is done. Classes from the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace are going to come handy if you went this way.

EDIT: Because of the shape of the tree (the root has about 500 children), processing just the first level in parallel should give good performance:

public void Traverse(Node root, bool parallel = true)
{
    if (node.Property == someValue)
        DoSomething(node);

    if (parallel)
    {
        Parallel.ForEach(node.Children, node =>
        {
            Traverse(node, false);
        });
    }
    else
    {
        foreach (var node in node.Children)
        {
            Traverse(node, false);
        }
    }
}
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I tried this, and unfortunately it performed worse than the single threaded code from my question... It took about 20% more CPU time, and surprisingly, about 300% more clock time. I measured both in ANTs profiler, and did additional stopwatch testing just to make sure the profiler itself was not causing the slowdown. –  Jason Hernandez Aug 18 '11 at 1:55
    
On a separate note System.Collections.Concurrent has been very useful, I'm throwing in a bit of FSharpSet here and there too. –  Jason Hernandez Aug 18 '11 at 2:00
    
@Jason, see edit for (hopefully) faster solution. –  svick Aug 18 '11 at 16:41

I might be missing something, but I don't see the need for a while at all. The while is just ensuring that you iterate over every node.

Instead just call your function recursively for each node in the tree.

public void Traverse(Node root)
{         
    if (root.Property = someValue) DoSomething(node);    
    Parallel.ForEach<Node>(root.Children, node => Traverse(node));
} 

edit: of course the alternative, if you prefer to process horizontally rather than vertically and your expensive operation is DoSomething, is to do the Traverse first.

public IEnumerable<Node> Traverse(Node root)
{
    // return all the nodes on this level first, before recurring
    foreach (var node in root.Children)
    {
        if (node.Property == someValue)
            yield return node;
    }

    // next check children of each node
    foreach (var node in root.Children)
    {
        var children = Traverse(node);
        foreach (var child in children)
        {
            yield return child;
        }
    }
}

Parallel.ForEach<Node>(Traverse(n), n => DoSomething(n));
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Looks simple, lots of nesting Parallel.Foreach. Note the use of a queue to walk the tree does it horizontally, recursion, vertically; this could change the logic (but in this case it looks like only if there are side-effects to DoSometing). –  FastAl Aug 18 '11 at 4:06
    
I think this addresses the 'problem' in a clean, simple way. –  Kirk Broadhurst Aug 18 '11 at 4:42
    
... but I've added another solution for horizontal traversal, just for fun. –  Kirk Broadhurst Aug 18 '11 at 5:00
    
Kirk that's some hot shit!!! I'm putting that in my sample code library! –  FastAl Aug 18 '11 at 14:40

Since the traversal of the tree is extremely fast, that calls to Children are atomic, and that it is the expensive nature of the DoSomething delegates that need to be executed in parallel, here's my take on the solution.

I started with the idea that I needed a function that takes a node as a parameter, creates a task that executes DoSomething, recursively calls itself to create tasks for all of the children nodes, and finally returns a Task that waits for all of the internal tasks to be completed.

Here it is:

Func<Node, Task> createTask = null;
createTask = n =>
{
    var nt = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        if (n.Property == someValue)
            DoSomething(n);
    });
    var nts = (new [] { nt, })
        .Concat(n.Children.Select(cn => createTask(cn)))
        .ToArray();

    return Task.Factory.ContinueWhenAll(nts, ts => { });
};

All that is required to call it and wait for the traversal to complete is:

createTask(root).Wait();

I tested this by creating a tree of nodes with 500 children off of the root with 14 levels, with 1 or 2 subsequent children per node. This gave me a total of 319,501 nodes.

I created a DoSomething method that performed some work - for (var i = 0; i < 100000 ; i++) { }; - and then ran the above code and compared it to processing the same tree in series.

The parallel version took 5,151 ms. The sequential version 13,746 ms.

I also performed a test where I reduced the number of nodes to 3,196 and increased the processing time for DoSomething by 100x. The TPL very cleverly reverts to running sequentially if its tasks complete quickly so lengthening the processing time made the code run with more parallelism.

Now the parallel version took 3,203ms. The sequential version took 11,581ms. And, if I only called the createTask(root) function without waiting for it to complete it took just 126ms. This means that the tree is traversed very quickly, and it would then make sense to lock the tree during traversal and unlock it when processing is taking place.

I hope this helps.

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Out of curiosity, did you use the breadth first single threaded algorithm for comparison, or a recursive one? –  Jason Hernandez Aug 18 '11 at 21:34
    
@Jason - I used a recursive, breadth-first, single-threaded algorithm. Why did you think it was one or the other and not both? –  Enigmativity Aug 18 '11 at 23:32
    
In my tests, the single threaded recursive function was very slow. I didn't see the speed improvements you saw, so I was wondering what you were comparing your algorithm to. –  Jason Hernandez Aug 19 '11 at 0:25
    
@Jason - I tested my algorithms along with the other answers posted here. Once I got the balance right with DoSomething taking long enough that the TPL did execute it asynchronously I found that everyone's answersincluding mine, where about the same. A big tick for the folks that built the TPL - it really rocks for performance and flexibility. –  Enigmativity Aug 19 '11 at 2:13

Assuming you have p processors maybe you do a Parallel.For over root.Children with p partitions. Each of these would do the traditional single-thread traverse over the subtrees, compare, and, rather than DoSomething, would enqueue a delegate to DoSomething to a concurrent queue. If the distribution is basically random and balanced and since traversal only does traversal/enqueue, that portion takes 1/p th the time. Also, traversal would likely exhaust itself before all the DoSomethings would execute, so you could have p consumers (executors of DoSomething) giving you maximum parallel execution, assuming all these operations are independent.

With this naive partitioning across the number of root children with randomly distributed subtrees, traversal itself will be speedy. With your consumers roughly allocated per processor, you also get max parallel DoSomething action.

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Perhaps using a List or Array instead of queue would help. Also use another List/Array to populate the next nodes to visit. You won't be processing list that until you finish the entire width first anyway. Something like this:

List<Node> todoList = new List<Node>();
todoList.Add(node);
while (todoList.Count > 0)
{
    // we'll be adding next nodes to process to this list so it needs to be thread-safe
    // or just sync access to a non-threadsafe list
    // if you know approx how many nodes you expect, you can pre-size the list
    ThreadSafeList<Node> nextList = new ThreadSafeList<Node>();  

    //todoList is readonly/static so can cache Count in simple variable
    int maxIndex  =  todoList.Count-1;
    // process todoList in parallel
    Parallel.For(0, maxIndex, i =>
    {
        // if list reads are thread-safe then no need to sync, otherwise sync
        Node x = todoList[i];

        //process x;
        // e.g. do somehting, get childrenNodesToWorkOnNext, etc.

        // add any child nodes that need to be processed next
        // e.g. nextList.add(childrenNodesToWorkOnNext);
    });

   // done with parallel processing by here so use the next todo list
   todoList = nextList;
)
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