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In my WPF form I have a textbox.
When a timer elapses, the content of the textbox needs to be fetched.
The timer elapsed is working in a different thread then the UI.

The question is kinda two-fold:

  • What is the easiest, most readable way to read the value from a GUI thread cross thread (I found several and they look too verbose for what should be something really basic)?
  • Can't I read the text in a non-blocking way? I don't care about thread safety in this case.

--EDIT--
I used the Dispatcher, but had a more verbose call then what John had:

originalTextBox.Dispatcher.Invoke(
    DispatcherPriority.Normal, 
    (ThreadStart) delegate{text=originalTextBox.Text;}
);

Wouldn't mind even terser though. Accessing a text property should be utterly basic.

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7 Answers 7

I use the following extension method to get around this:

    public static string GetTextThreadSafely(this TextBoxBase source)
    {
        if (source.InvokeRequired)
        {
            var text = String.Empty;
            source.Invoke((Action)(() => { text = source.GetTextThreadSafely(); }));
            return text;
        }
        else
        {
            return source.Text;
        }
    }

And of course, this method has to be added in a separate static class.

share|improve this answer

Just happen to stumble into here. A while back I just started building up a static class that I can add to my projects for fast access to some common control properties. It's bloated over time but makes things pretty easy while hiding away a lot of dispatcher code. Crude but effective. Might give you some ideas. I can basically do things like this:

string temp = SafeGuiWpf.GetText(originalTextBox);

Here is what the SafeGuiWpf last looked like, if you find it helpful. (Think it works in NET 3 and up, but it's been a while)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Controls.Primitives;
using System.ComponentModel;

public class SafeGuiWpf
{
    public static object GetTag(Control C)
    {
        if (C.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return C.Tag;
        else return C.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<Control, object>(GetTag), C);
    }
    public static string GetText(TextBox TB)
    {
        if (TB.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return TB.Text;
        else return (string)TB.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<TextBox,string>(GetText), TB);
    }
    public static string GetText(ComboBox TB)
    {
        if (TB.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return TB.Text;
        else return (string)TB.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<ComboBox,string>(GetText), TB);
    }

    public static string GetText(PasswordBox TB)
    {
        if (TB.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return TB.Password;
        else return (string)TB.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<PasswordBox, string>(GetText), TB);
    }

    public static void SetText(TextBlock TB, string Str)
    {
        if (TB.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) TB.Text = Str;
        else TB.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<TextBlock,string>(SetText), TB, Str);
    }
    public static void SetText(TextBox TB, string Str)
    {
        if (TB.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) TB.Text = Str;
        else TB.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<TextBox, string>(SetText), TB, Str);
    }
    public static void AppendText(TextBox TB, string Str)
    {
        if (TB.Dispatcher.CheckAccess())
        {
            TB.AppendText(Str);
            TB.ScrollToEnd(); // scroll to end?
        }
        else TB.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<TextBox, string>(AppendText), TB, Str);
    }
    public static bool? GetChecked(CheckBox Ck)
    {
        if (Ck.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return Ck.IsChecked;
        else return (bool?)Ck.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<CheckBox,bool?>(GetChecked), Ck);
    }
    public static void SetChecked(CheckBox Ck, bool? V)
    {
        if (Ck.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) Ck.IsChecked = V;
        else Ck.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<CheckBox, bool?>(SetChecked), Ck, V);
    }
    public static bool GetChecked(MenuItem Ck)
    {
        if (Ck.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return Ck.IsChecked;
        else return (bool)Ck.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<MenuItem, bool>(GetChecked), Ck);
    }
    public static void SetChecked(MenuItem Ck, bool V)
    {
        if (Ck.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) Ck.IsChecked = V;
        else Ck.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<MenuItem, bool>(SetChecked), Ck, V);
    }
    public static bool? GetChecked(RadioButton Ck)
    {
        if (Ck.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return Ck.IsChecked;
        else return (bool?)Ck.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<RadioButton, bool?>(GetChecked), Ck);
    }
    public static void SetChecked(RadioButton Ck, bool? V)
    {
        if (Ck.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) Ck.IsChecked = V;
        else Ck.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<RadioButton, bool?>(SetChecked), Ck, V);
    }

    public static void SetVisible(UIElement Emt, Visibility V)
    {
        if (Emt.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) Emt.Visibility = V;
        else Emt.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<UIElement, Visibility>(SetVisible), Emt, V);
    }
    public static Visibility GetVisible(UIElement Emt)
    {
        if (Emt.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return Emt.Visibility;
        else return (Visibility)Emt.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<UIElement, Visibility>(GetVisible), Emt);
    }
    public static bool GetEnabled(UIElement Emt)
    {
        if (Emt.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return Emt.IsEnabled;
        else return (bool)Emt.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<UIElement, bool>(GetEnabled), Emt);
    }
    public static void SetEnabled(UIElement Emt, bool V)
    {
        if (Emt.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) Emt.IsEnabled = V;
        else Emt.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<UIElement, bool>(SetEnabled), Emt, V);
    }

    public static void SetSelectedItem(Selector Ic, object Selected)
    {
        if (Ic.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) Ic.SelectedItem = Selected;
        else Ic.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<Selector, object>(SetSelectedItem), Ic, Selected);
    }
    public static object GetSelectedItem(Selector Ic)
    {
        if (Ic.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return Ic.SelectedItem;
        else return Ic.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<Selector, object>(GetSelectedItem), Ic);
    }
    public static int GetSelectedIndex(Selector Ic)
    {
        if (Ic.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return Ic.SelectedIndex;
        else return (int)Ic.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<Selector, int>(GetSelectedIndex), Ic);
    }

    delegate MessageBoxResult MsgBoxDelegate(Window owner, string text, string caption, MessageBoxButton button, MessageBoxImage icon);
    public static MessageBoxResult MsgBox(Window owner, string text, string caption, MessageBoxButton button, MessageBoxImage icon)
    {
        if (owner.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return MessageBox.Show(owner, text, caption, button, icon);
        else return (MessageBoxResult)owner.Dispatcher.Invoke(new MsgBoxDelegate(MsgBox), owner, text, caption, button, icon);
    }

    public static double GetRangeValue(RangeBase RngBse)
    {
        if (RngBse.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return RngBse.Value;
        else return (double)RngBse.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<RangeBase, double>(GetRangeValue), RngBse);
    }
    public static void SetRangeValue(RangeBase RngBse, double V)
    {
        if (RngBse.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) RngBse.Value = V;
        else RngBse.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<RangeBase, double>(SetRangeValue), RngBse, V);
    }

    public static T CreateWindow<T>(Window Owner) where T : Window, new()
    {
        if (Owner.Dispatcher.CheckAccess())
        {
            var Win = new T(); // Window created on GUI thread
            Win.Owner = Owner;
            return Win;
        }
        else return (T)Owner.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<Window, T>(CreateWindow<T>), Owner);
    }

    public static bool? ShowDialog(Window Dialog)
    {
        if (Dialog.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return Dialog.ShowDialog();
        else return (bool?)Dialog.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<Window, bool?>(ShowDialog), Dialog);
    }

    public static void SetDialogResult(Window Dialog, bool? Result)
    {
        if (Dialog.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) Dialog.DialogResult = Result;
        else Dialog.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action<Window, bool?>(SetDialogResult), Dialog, Result);
    }

    public static Window GetWindowOwner(Window window)
    {
        if (window.Dispatcher.CheckAccess()) return window.Owner;
        else return (Window)window.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Func<Window, Window>(GetWindowOwner), window);
    }

} // END CLASS: SafeGuiWpf

In retrospect, might have made them even more slick if I did these as class extensions.

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Another answer is to use Jeff Wilcox's SmartDispatcher class.

Somewhere in the constructor or Load event do a SmartDispatcher.Initialize() (to set the UI dispatcher)

Then anywhere you need to set a property or call a method:

Action a = delegate { <statements> };
SmartDispatcher.BeginInvoke(a);

The beauty of this is that you don't need to know whether it is on the UI thread or not (and you may need to do it from both). The SmartDispatcher takes care of the thread switch if necessary.

The above is asynchronous, but if you need it synchronous, just add another method to call Invoke instead of BeginInvoke.

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There is no "quick hack" for reading a GUI object's values from a differing thread than the one that created it. WPF will just not allow you to do it all. Windows Forms would complain occassionally, but WPF is way more strict.

You need to learn about the Dispatcher. It might look verbose, but it really isn't that hard to understand. You pass a delegate to the dispatcher that points to a method you want called on the GUI thread, and it does it.

Here's a nice simple example:

http://www.switchonthecode.com/tutorials/working-with-the-wpf-dispatcher

share|improve this answer
    
So no way of calling the value thread-unsafe then? I only need to get it, not set it. –  Boris Callens Apr 2 '09 at 15:07
    
I'm not really looking for a quick hack, I'm looking for something readable. A short hand if you will. –  Boris Callens Apr 2 '09 at 15:27
    
sorry to burst your bubble, but using the dispatcher IS shorthand. :) you want to write your own dispatcher/marshaller? –  x0n Apr 2 '09 at 15:45

You can either:

  • Use the Dispatcher to schedule a message to execute on the UI thread from a background thread. A DispatcherPriority of Send will get you the fastest response possible.
  • Use a DispatcherTimer to periodically execute messages on the UI thread.
  • Use a OneWayToSource binding to connect the Text property to a property on your background component. That way, you won't have to do any work to get the property value - it will already have been supplied to your component.
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My solutiosn... The XAML:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.Window1"
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">
<Grid>
    <TextBox Height="23" Margin="28,27,130,0" Name="textBox1" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
    <Button Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="28,56,0,0" Name="button1" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="75" Click="button1_Click">Button</Button>
    <TextBox Margin="34,85,12,54" Name="textBox2" />
</Grid>

and the cs File:

public partial class Window1 : Window
{
    public Window1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        new System.Threading.Thread(this.Cuenta).Start();
    }


    private void Cuenta()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            this.SetValues(string.Format("Counting... {0} ", i));
    }

    private void SetValues(string str)
    {
        System.Windows.Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(
            System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherPriority.Normal,
            (System.Threading.ThreadStart)delegate { textBox1.Text = str; });
    }



}

the second textbox is for a type test while the thread is runing

share|improve this answer

Oisin is right, you need to look at Dispatcher. Something like this should work, and is not too verbose:

System.Windows.Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(
DispatcherPriority.Normal,
(ThreadStart)delegate { text = MyTextBox.Text; });
share|improve this answer
    
Well it's better then what I had originalTextBox.Dispatcher.Invoke( DispatcherPriority.Normal, new Action( delegate() { text = originalTextBox.Text; })); –  Boris Callens Apr 3 '09 at 7:02

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