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I have a request for some advice on how to approach this script I want to write in Perl. Basically I have a file that looks like :

  id: 1
  Relationship: ""
  name: shelby
  pet: 1
  color:4

There are certain keywords such as pet and color that have numbers after then. I want to be able to take in a file and look for these keywords (there are 5 or 6 of them) and then change the number to the word that number corresponds to. That is to say for the keyword "Pet"---> 0 =dog, 1 = cat, 2=fish. And for the keyword "color" 0 = red, 1=blue,2=purple,3=brown,4=white. The script should find and change these numbers. The goal should be an output file that looks like:

      id: 1
      Relationship: ""
      name: shelby
      pet: cat
      color:white

I've been struggling with how to do this for a while. I looked up online maybe I could do an array of hashes or something but I'm relatively new to Perl and don't know exactly how to even approach this problem.... Any advice would be much appreciated!

Thanks

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Usage: script.pl file.txt > output.txt

use strict;
use warnings;

my %tags = (
    "pet" => [ qw(dog cat fish) ],
    "color" => [ qw(red blue purple brown white) ],
);

my $rx = join '|', keys %tags;

while (<>) {
    s/^\s*($rx):\s*(\d+)/$1: $tags{$1}[$2]/;
    print;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have a follow up question. What if I wanted to do something like change all the semicolons to equal signs. Do I have to go through the file twice or can I do that inside the while(<>) –  the.director Aug 18 '11 at 18:21
    
s/;/=/g. You might want to read about these things in the documentation: link –  TLP Aug 18 '11 at 18:24

If we're talking about a small set of values, you could have a hash of arrays:

%lookups = ( pet => [ "dog", "cat", "fish" ],
             color => [ "red", "blue", "purple", "brown", "white" ] );

Then, when you're reading the file, check each keyword against the hash. If it has a key with that keyword in it, replace the value in the line you read with the value from the hash.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm I didn't think about doing a hash of arrays. I'll look into it thank you –  the.director Aug 17 '11 at 23:44

This should do it

use strict;

my $inputFileName = 'E:\test.txt';
my $outputFileName = 'E:\test2.txt';


my %Colors = ( 1 => 'Red' , 2 => 'Green' , 4 => 'Blue' );
my %Pets = ( 1 => 'Dog' , 2 => 'Cat' );

open( IN , "<" , $inputFileName) or die "$inputFileName could not be opened $!";
open( OUT, ">" , $outputFileName) or die "$outputFileName could not be opened $!";

while(<IN>)
{
    my $line = $_;
    if (/^(\s*pet\s*:\s*)(\d+)/ )
    {
        $line = $1. $Pets{$2} . "\n";
    }
    elsif (/\s*^color\s*:\s*(\d+)/ )
    {
       $line = $1. $Colors{$2} . "\n";
    }

    print OUT $line;
}
close(IN);
close(OUT);
share|improve this answer
    
If i want to read a file from the command line I can just change "my $inputFileName = $ARGV[1]" right? –  the.director Aug 17 '11 at 23:38
    
Yup that is correct. –  parapura rajkumar Aug 17 '11 at 23:41
    
$ARGV[1] would be the second argument, and $ARGV[0] the first. But why complicate things? If you're using command line file names, just use while (<>) which will automatically open the file for you. –  TLP Aug 18 '11 at 0:19

Using zigdon's suggestion

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.014;

my %param = (pet   => [qw/dog cat fish/],
             color => [qw/ red blue purple brown white/],
);

while (<DATA>) {
    if (/^(pet|color):\s*(\d)$/) {
        print "$1: $param{ $1 }[$2]\n";
    }
    else {
        print;  
    }
}


__DATA__
id: 1
Relationship: ""
name: shelby
pet: 1
color:4
share|improve this answer

If there are not many cases, you can try something like this, to be run with perl -p:

if (/^id/) 
{
    s/\d+/%h=(1=>"dog",2=>"warf",3=>"ee");$h{$&}/e;
}
if (/^other/) 
{ 
    s/\d+/%h=(1=>"other_thing",3=>"etc",4=>"etc2");$h{$&}/e;
}

EDIT:

To automate the tests, you can do something like (also taking the idea of hashes from zigdon):

my @interesting_tags = ("color", "pet");
my $regexp = "(" .  join("|" , @interesting_tags) . ")";

my %lookups = ( pet => [ "dog", "cat", "fish" ],
                color => [ "red", "blue", "purple", "brown", "white" ] );


while (<>)
{
    if (/$regexp/)
    {
        my $element = $&;
        s/\d+/$lookups{$element}[$&]/e;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I'll have about 20 things to look up but each will only have about 4 numbers associated. BUt having a bunch of IF statements will work if I can't find a more elegant solution –  the.director Aug 17 '11 at 23:36
    
I'll give it a twist to see if you like it. See my edit. –  Diego Sevilla Aug 17 '11 at 23:39
    
Hmmmm that looks good actually thanks –  the.director Aug 18 '11 at 1:32

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