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I've been trying to wrap my head around how javascript functions and scope work, and it just doesn't make sense to me. Can someone please explain why the following code outputs: 'animal says meow' instead of 'kitty says meow'?

(function($, exports){
  var animal = function(){};
  exports.Animal = animal;
})(jQuery, window);

(function($, Animal){
  var kitty = new Animal;
  kitty.sayHi = function(){
    console.log(this);
    console.log('says meow');
  }
  $($.proxy(function(){
    $('#js_test').click($.proxy(kitty.sayHi, kitty));
  }, kitty))
})(jQuery, Animal);

UPDATE

@FunkyFresh pointed out in the comments that console.log calls toString when it's passed an object, which by default returns the object's type (animal). When I update the above code with

animal.prototype.name = 'Mammal';

in the top block of code, and

kitty.name = 'Zax';

in the bottom, the console outputs 'Zax says meow', which seems about right.

share|improve this question
    
The example shown on jQuery's site gives a pretty good comment break down, just follow the logic, it jumps around a lot. api.jquery.com/jQuery.proxy –  Patrick Robert Shea O'Connor Aug 18 '11 at 0:35
1  
This is the interview question from hell. –  RSG Aug 18 '11 at 0:43
1  
Interviewing a front end guy next week. I think I will bust this out! Thanks for the suggestion. –  numbers1311407 Aug 18 '11 at 0:47
    
@nums: does that imply you know the answer? Please share :) –  RSG Aug 18 '11 at 0:49
    
@RSG: I don't think it does; that's the sinister thing about it. –  mowwwalker Aug 18 '11 at 0:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(function($) {})(jQuery)

in this code (function($){}) declares the function. Then (jQuery) imediately calls the function passing in the jQuery object.

so the first block of code passes in jQuery and the window object. Animal is added to the window object, which is the global scope.

in the second block a click event is added to an element and kitty.sayHi is passed in as the event handler. However if the event handler was not proxied then the this keyword in the eventhandler would return the element that has triggered the event. So by using the proxy the scope of the eventhandler becomes kitty.

I hope that is correct, this is new to me also.

share|improve this answer
    
This is hardly the time to hope to be correct. This answer needs and deserves a proper, educated response. –  mowwwalker Aug 18 '11 at 0:50
    
Yeah, that's how I follow the logic too. What trips me up at the end is that if the the scope of the eventhandler is 'kitty', why does it return 'animal'? It looks like .sayHi is now a method on animal, not just kitty. –  kateray Aug 18 '11 at 0:54
1  
ok i'm pretty sure it is correct. And my answer is clearly educated. –  FunkyFresh84 Aug 18 '11 at 0:55
2  
well animal = function(){}; is a constructor of an empty object. So Kitty's prototype.constructor is animal so it is of type animal basically. console.log expects a string so it calls toString on the animal object which by default returns it's type.. animal. I'd quite like to add a toString method the animal object that returns something different just to check though. –  FunkyFresh84 Aug 18 '11 at 1:05
    
Hey, I think that's it! Instead of 'console.log(this)', I tried 'console.log(this.name)', and I assigned different values to animal.name and kitty.name. When I ran the code, it printed out kitty's name not animal's name. –  kateray Aug 18 '11 at 1:14

Update: kitty is an instance of Animal. So it'll never say kitty. All those proxy wrappers are careful misdirections.

Lets see:

(function($, exports){
  var animal = function(){};
  exports.Animal = animal;
})(jQuery, window);

Just a disguise to say: window.Animal = function(){};

You're creating an anonymous function passing jQuery and window object to it and executing it immediately. This creates Animal class in window scope


Now jquery.proxy allows you to change the context of a function: jQuery.proxy( functionName, context ) - so inside functionName, this refers to context (this == context).

$.proxy(kitty.sayHi, kitty) says call sayHi passing kitty as context.

Now kitty = new Animal (this is called a closure actaully since you're accessing parent function's variable), so this -> Animal

(function($, Animal){

  // create a new instance of Animal, assign it to local variable kitty
  var kitty = new Animal;

  // assign sayHi to kitty object
  kitty.sayHi = function(){
    console.log(this);
    console.log('says meow');
  }


  // $() shortcut that says run this code on DOM ready
  $($.proxy(function(){   
    // this proxy almost does nothing as we do not refer to this object insdie it

    // says on click of js_Test, call kitty.sayHi with context = kitty
    $('#js_test').click($.proxy(kitty.sayHi, kitty));

  }, kitty))

})(jQuery, Animal);

So when the click handler is called, its actually Animal.sayHi.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually if I take out that first proxy, which you said does almost nothing, the code doesn't work anymore. Any idea why that would be? –  kateray Aug 18 '11 at 1:37
1  
It does: jsfiddle.net/mrchief/y766D/3 –  Mrchief Aug 18 '11 at 1:40
1  
+1 for "this proxy almost does nothing...". It would be a little more interesting if the inner $.proxy took advantage of the outer one by doing $.proxy(this.sayHi, this). –  user113716 Aug 18 '11 at 1:42
    
Oh, whoops, you're right. Typo on my end. –  kateray Aug 18 '11 at 1:43
    
@patrick dw: yep! But I think that would give it away a little more too... Having multiple kitty that do nothing is more confusing - do they do smothing, or not? –  Mrchief Aug 18 '11 at 1:47

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