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I came up with the following code to decorate instance methods using a decorator that requires the instance itself as an argument:

from functools import wraps

def logging_decorator(tricky_instance):
    def wrapper(fn):
        @wraps(fn)
        def wrapped(*a, **kw):
            if tricky_instance.log:
                print("Calling %s.." % fn.__name__)
            return fn(*a, **kw)
        return wrapped
    return wrapper     

class Tricky(object):
    def __init__(self, log):
        self.log = log
        self.say_hi = logging_decorator(self)(self.say_hi)

    def say_hi(self):
       print("Hello, world!")


i1 = Tricky(log=True)
i2 = Tricky(log=False)

i1.say_hi()
i2.say_hi()

This seems to work great, but I fear that I may have overlooked some unintended side effects of this trick. Am I about to shoot myself in the foot, or is this safe?

Note that I don't actually want to use this for logging, it's just the shortest meaningful example I could come up with.

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Seems legit. Imho. –  Evpok Aug 18 '11 at 0:48
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2 Answers

It's not really clear to me why you would ever want to do this. If you want to assign a new method type dynamically use types:

import types

class Tricky(object):
    def __init__(self):
        def method(self):
            print('Hello')
        self.method = types.MethodType(method, self)

If you want to do something with the instance, do it in the __init__ method. If you just want access to the method's instance inside the decorator, you can use the im_self attribute:

def decorator(tricky_instance):
    def wrapper(meth):
        print(meth.im_self == tricky_instance)
        return meth
    return wrapper

Personally, I think this is veering into Maybe-I-Shouldn't-Use-Decorators land.

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I want to automatically recall the instance methods on (temporary) network problems, indicated by exceptions. Which exceptions are temporary and which are permanent depends on the actual instance (the instances represent Amazon S3 objects whose consistency guarantees depend on the storage location). –  Nikratio Aug 18 '11 at 0:56
    
I don't understand what your code does / is good for. Could you elaborate? –  Nikratio Aug 18 '11 at 0:57
1  
My code creates a new instance method in __init__. I guess you are trying to write a decorator, and you want the decorator to have access to the instance of the method being decorated, to generalize the decorator? –  zeekay Aug 18 '11 at 1:02
    
Effectively yes. But it's not a generalization, because just using a lot of different decorators wouldn't help. The behaviour of the decorator depends on a property of the instance whose method is being called. –  Nikratio Aug 18 '11 at 1:09
    
I can't think of any particular problems you'd have because you are accessing the instance of a method from a decorator. You are probably in more danger of forgetting how your code works :) –  zeekay Aug 18 '11 at 1:43
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think I was trying to be needlessly smart. There seems to be an embarrassingly simpler solution:

from functools import wraps

def logging_decorator(fn):
    @wraps(fn)
    def wrapped(self, *a, **kw):
        if self.log:
            print("Calling %s.." % fn.__name__)
        return fn(self, *a, **kw)
    return wrapped

class Tricky(object):
    def __init__(self, log):
        self.log = log

    @logging_decorator
    def say_hi(self):
       print("Hello, world!")

i1 = Tricky(log=True)
i2 = Tricky(log=False)

i1.say_hi()
i2.say_hi()
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