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I'm just wondering why we usually use logical OR || between two booleans not bitwise OR |, though they are both working well.

I mean, look at the following:

if(true  | true)  // pass
if(true  | false) // pass
if(false | true)  // pass
if(false | false) // no pass
if(true  || true)  // pass
if(true  || false) // pass
if(false || true)  // pass
if(false || false) // no pass

Can we use | instead of ||? Same thing with & and &&.

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5  
Most people forget that | is a non-short-circuiting boolean operator in addition to being a bitwise operator. –  John Meagher Sep 18 '08 at 20:47
    
Details on the difference are in the JLS. See java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/… –  John Meagher Sep 18 '08 at 20:57
52  
They are not the same. Please check out the tutorials on them especially regarding short-circuit evaluation vs eager evaluation. || and && short-circuit while | and & are eager. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 18 '11 at 3:23
1  
Just out of curiosity, in what case would you actually want to use the non-short circuited versions? I almost always see && and ||, but never & |. If you're doing something that depends on side effects, I don't see why you'd use something like (a & b | c) since someone could easily think "I can optimize this by using the short circuited versions." –  Mike Bantegui Aug 18 '11 at 23:57
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24 Answers

up vote 205 down vote accepted

If you use the || and && forms, rather than the | and & forms of these operators, Java will not bother to evaluate the right-hand operand alone.

It's a matter of if you want to short-circuit the evaluation or not -- most of the time you want to.

A good way to illustrate the benefits of short-circuiting would be to consider the following example.

Boolean b = true;
if(b || foo.timeConsumingCall())
{
   //we entered without calling timeConsumingCall()
}

Another benefit, as Jeremy and Peter mentioned, for short-circuiting is the null reference check:

if(string != null && string.isEmpty())
{
    //we check for string being null before calling isEmpty()
}

more info

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87  
The canonical example is foo != null && foo.hasBar() –  Jeremy Heiler Aug 18 '11 at 3:47
11  
... but Shawn's example is clearer, IMHO. +1! –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Aug 18 '11 at 7:16
1  
If you add in about possible null reference exception using | from @Jeremy's comment then this is great answer. –  Peter Kelly Aug 18 '11 at 7:55
2  
I'm surprised noone mentioned when you want to use |. The most common scenario I use it is when a variable is modified in the check like (j>3 | ++i>3) or (++i > 3 | modifiesGlobalAmongOtherThings() = true). Not too common though. –  AndSoYouCode Aug 18 '11 at 8:30
6  
Another canonical example is string == null || string.isEmpty() ;) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 18 '11 at 9:42
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| does not do short-circuit evaluation in boolean expressions. || will stop evaluating if the first operand is true, but | won't.

In addition, | can be used to perform the bitwise-OR operation on byte/short/int/long values. || cannot.

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Provide a complete answer and I'll accept it. So far you're the first to pick this aspect of it up. –  John Meagher Sep 18 '08 at 20:42
    
Missing the bitwise aspect of | –  John Meagher Sep 18 '08 at 20:44
    
Damn, I'm out of votes today, I'll come back and up-vote this. –  John Meagher Sep 18 '08 at 20:49
    
Cool, my first accepted answer. Thanks! :D –  Michael Myers Sep 18 '08 at 20:51
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So just to build on the other answers with an example, short-circuiting is crucial in the following defensive checks:

if (foo == null || foo.isClosed()) {
    return;
}

if (bar != null && bar.isBlue()) {
    foo.doSomething();
}

Using | and & instead could result in a NullPointerException being thrown here.

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+1, very good point made. –  Shadur Aug 18 '11 at 7:22
    
This is the best answer, imo. –  oscilatingcretin Aug 18 '11 at 12:45
    
If you applied the NullObject pattern it wouldn't (or rather would negate the answer). Also, I'd say checking whether the foo is blue is something internal to foo. If it's blue, then doSomething should do nothing. –  nicodemus13 Aug 18 '11 at 16:07
    
@nicodemus13 - good points, though the Null Object pattern is only sometimes desirable, and the body might be something other than another call to foo. Peter Lawrey's "canonical example" is the best. –  Paul Bellora Aug 18 '11 at 18:33
    
@Khan: Yes, I was being rather pernickety, and the Null Object isn't always suitable. I've just rather got into the habit of sub-consciously refactoring things. There's nothing particularly wrong with your answer. –  nicodemus13 Aug 18 '11 at 20:45
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Logical || and && check the right hand side only if necessary. The | and & check both all the time.

For example:

int i = 12;
if (i == 10 & i < 9) // It will check if i == 10 and if i < 9
...

Rewrite it:

int i = 12;
if (i == 10 && i < 9) // It will check if i == 10 and stop checking afterward because i doesn't = 10
...

Another example:

int i = 12;
if (i == 12 | i > 10) // It will check if i == 12 and it will check if i > 10
...

Rewrite it:

int i = 12;
if (i == 12 || i > 10) // It will check if i == 12, it does, so it stops checking and executes what is in the if statement
...
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1  
+1 I like answers with examples. –  Eng.Fouad Aug 18 '11 at 3:35
    
Best examples so far –  Mangusto Mar 29 '13 at 0:09
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In addition to short-circuiting, another thing to keep in mind is that doing a bitwise logic operation on values that can be other than 0 or 1 has a very different meaning than conditional logic. While it USUALLY is the same for | and ||, with & and && you get very different results (e.g. 2 & 4 is 0/false while 2 && 4 is 1/true).

If the thing you're getting from a function is actually an error code and you're testing for non-0-ness, this can matter quite a lot.

This isn't as much of an issue in Java where you have to explicitly typecast to boolean or compare with 0 or the like, but in other languages with similar syntax (C/C++ et al) it can be quite confusing.

Also, note that & and | can only apply to integer-type values, and not everything that can be equivalent to a boolean test. Again, in non-Java languages, there are quite a few things that can be used as a boolean with an implicit != 0 comparison (pointers, floats, objects with an operator bool(), etc.) and bitwise operators are almost always nonsensical in those contexts.

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3  
I am glad that at least someone mentioned the whole purpose of bitwise operators existence. –  ulidtko Aug 18 '11 at 16:20
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Also notice a common pitfall: The non lazy operators have precedence over the lazy ones, so:

boolean a, b, c;
a || b && c; //resolves to a || (b && c)
a | b && c; //resolves to (a | b) && c

Be careful when mixing them.

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|| is the logical or operator while | is the bitwise or operator.

boolean a = true;
boolean b = false;

if (a || b) {
}

int a = 0x0001;
a = a | 0x0002;
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1  
Missing that | is also a non-short-circuiting boolean operator. –  John Meagher Sep 18 '08 at 20:51
2  
@John Meagher: That's implicit, as it's bitwise. –  L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ Aug 24 '10 at 18:35
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In Addition to the fact that | is a bitwise-operator: || is a short-circuit operator - when one element is false, it will not check the others.

 if(something || someotherthing)
 if(something | someotherthing)

if something is TRUE, || will not evaluate someotherthing, while | will do. If the variables in your if-statements are actually function calls, using || is possibly saving a lot of performance.

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Why would you ever use | in an if statement. || is boolean, | is not, | would only be boolean if your already working on two boolean values. –  FlySwat Sep 18 '08 at 20:44
    
This is the first answer to get it all. –  John Meagher Sep 18 '08 at 20:46
    
This answer is incorrect. If something is FALSE, both operators will go on to the next operand. The difference arises only when the first operand is true. –  Michael Myers Sep 18 '08 at 20:47
    
To bad it has an absolutely ridiculous example. –  FlySwat Sep 18 '08 at 20:47
    
I have no idea why anyone would use | or & in an if-statement for simple boolean comparison, but it's perfectly legal, and i've actually seen examples of that when I started learning programming. –  Michael Stum Sep 18 '08 at 20:47
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The only time you would use | or & instead of || or && is when you have very simple boolean expressions and the cost of short cutting (i.e. a branch) is greater than the time you save by not evaluating the later expressions.

However, this is a micro-optimisation which rarely matters except in the most low level code.

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1  
It would be interesting whether the compiler does this automatically in some cases. –  starblue Aug 18 '11 at 13:56
    
Perhaps the JIT could, but the compiler tends to only deal with simple optimisations. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 18 '11 at 16:37
1  
Yes, I've also seen situations where | is significantly faster than the branch overhead of ||, especially on CPUs with no or limited branch prediction. It's rare but not unheard of. One of my coworkers got into a revert war in some code with a contractor because he was (correctly) using | and the contractor kept thinking that was "wrong." –  fluffy Aug 19 '11 at 5:17
3  
@Fluffy, the moral of the story being that if you do something tricky, it needs to commented as to why you did this or your efforts could be wasted later. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 19 '11 at 15:54
1  
Yeah, eventually he added a comment (at my suggestion for how to get the contractor to stop 'fixing' it), and all is well. –  fluffy Aug 19 '11 at 17:56
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a | b: evaluate b in any case

a || b: evaluate b only if a evaluates to false

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| is the binary or operator

|| is the logic or operator
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Missing that | is also a non-short-circuiting boolean operator. –  John Meagher Sep 18 '08 at 20:52
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The operators || and && are called conditional operators, while | and & are called bitwise operators. They serve different purposes.

Conditional operators works only with expressions that statically evaluate to boolean on both left- and right-hand sides.

Bitwise operators works with any numeric operands.

If you want to perform a logical comparison, you should use conditional operators, since you will add some kind of type safety to your code.

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Um, | and & are also conditional operators. Please see the link in my comment to the original post. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 18 '11 at 3:30
    
@Hovercraft Full Of Eels: That chart is a bit misleading; it's referring to them as conditional operators ONLY in the context of boolean values, where they are mathematically equivalent to eager logical operators. When you start dealing with things that have values other than 0 or 1, or floating point values or pointers or whatever, the comparison breaks down. –  fluffy Aug 18 '11 at 17:19
    
@fluffy: there's nothing misleading about the chart since the discussion was only about boolean operators. That the | and & can be used as bit-wise operators is a completely separate issue. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 18 '11 at 17:54
1  
It would be more accurate to refer to them as bit-wise operators used on boolean values, and not boolean operators. They just HAPPEN to be mathematically-equivalent when there's only a single bit. –  fluffy Aug 18 '11 at 19:57
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The Java || and && operators only evaluate the right hand side of the boolean expression if they need to. This is known as a lazy evaluation.

The equivalent code for the || operator is

// Simulate 

// if(b||c)
//   doThis();
// else
//   doThat();
if(b)
  doThis();
else
  if(c)
    doThis();
else
    doThat();

// Similar for &&

This takes a lot less time to evaluate certain expressions. However, sometimes you may want to use the | operator:

public boolean updateGlobal(){
  global = 2;
  return true;
}

if(false | updateGlobal()){
  foo();
}

Because the right-hand side of the expression has a side-effect, we want it to be evaluated no matter what. This is a quite bad practice though.

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A side note: Java has |= but not an ||=

An example of when you must use || is when the first expression is a test to see if the second expression would blow up. e.g. Using a single | in hte following case could result in an NPE.

public static boolean isNotSet(String text) {
   return text == null || text.length() == 0;
}
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| = bitwise or, || = logic or

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Missing that | is also a non-short-circuiting boolean operator. –  John Meagher Sep 18 '08 at 20:56
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|| is a logical or and | is a bit-wise or.

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Take a look at:

http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/operators.html

| is bitwise inclusive OR

|| is logical OR

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Missing that | is also a non-short-circuiting boolean operator. –  John Meagher Sep 18 '08 at 20:54
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One main difference is that || and && exhibit "short-circuiting", so the RHS will only be evaluated if needed.

For e.g.

if (a || b) {
    path1...
} else {
    path2..
}

Above if a is true then b will not be tested and path1 is executed. If | was used then both sides would be evaluated even if 'a' is true.

See Here and here, for a little more information.

Hope this helps.

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usually I use when there is pre increment and post increment operator. Look at the following code:

package ocjpPractice;
/**
 * @author tithik
 *
 */
public class Ex1 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    int i=10;
    int j=9;
    int x=10;
    int y=9;
    if(i==10 | ++i>j){
        System.out.println("it will print in first if");  
        System.out.println("i is: "+i);
    }

    if(x==10 ||++x>y){
        System.out.println("it will print in second if");   
        System.out.println("x is: "+x);
    }
    }
}

output:

it will print in first if
i is: 11

it will print in second if
x is: 10

both if blocks are same but result is different. when there is |, both the conditions will be evaluated. But if it is ||, it will not evaluate second condition as the first condition is already true.

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I find this very confusing –  NimChimpsky Feb 20 '13 at 13:54
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Non short-circuiting can be useful. Sometimes you want to make sure that two expressions evaluate. For example, say you have a method that removes an object from two separate lists. You might want to do something like this:

class foo {

    ArrayList<Bar> list1 = new ArrayList<Bar>();
    ArrayList<Bar> list2 = new ArrayList<Bar>();

    //Returns true if bar is removed from both lists, otherwise false.
    boolean removeBar(Bar bar) {
        return (list1.remove(bar) & list2.remove(bar));
    }
}

If your method instead used the conditional operand, it would fail to remove the object from the second list if the first list returned false.

//Fails to execute the second remove if the first returns false.
boolean removeBar(Bar bar) {
    return (list1.remove(bar) && list2.remove(bar));
}

It's not amazingly useful, and (as with most programming tasks) you could achieve it with other means. But it is a use case for bitwise operands.

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Java operators

| is bitwise or, || is logical or.

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| is a bitwise operator. || is a logical operator.

One will take two bits and or them.

One will determine truth (this OR that) If this is true or that is true, then the answer is true.

Oh, and dang people answer these questions fast.

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|| returns a boolean value by OR'ing two values (Thats why its known as a LOGICAL or)

IE:

if (A || B)

Would return true if either A or B is true, or false if they are both false.

| is an operator that performs a bitwise operation on two values. To better understand bitwise operations, you can read here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation

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1).(expression1 | expression2), | operator will evaluate expression2 irrespective of whether the result of expression1 is true or false.

Example:

class Or 
{
public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    boolean b=true;

    if (b | test());
}

static boolean test()
{
     System.out.println("No short circuit!");
     return false;
}
}

2).(expression1 || expression2), || operator will not evaluate expression2 if expression1 is true.

Example:

class Or 
{
public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    boolean b=true;

    if (b || test())
    {
        System.out.println("short circuit!");
    }
}

static boolean test()
{
    System.out.println("No short circuit!");
    return false;
}
}
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