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I want to take a .txt file as input from user through raw_input.

Once the input is taken, I want the txt file name given by user to be accessed and the contents from it written into another file (each in next row).

I am having a problem with how to connect a and b above or how to link raw input with reading of file. I need help...the code is as follows (but it is erroneous :S).

import sys,os,csv

x = raw_input("Enter name of file to be written row wise:")
ui = "x" + txt
for ui in x:
    data = open("ui").readlines()
    outfile = open("myfile.csv","w")
    out = csv.writer(outfile)
for row in data:
    row = row.strip().split(';')
    if row:
        for subrow in row:
            subrow = subrow.strip().split()
            if subrow:
                out.writerow(subrow)
outfile.close()

I get the error:

cannot concatenate 'str' and 'list' objects

share|improve this question
1  
Not sure about your error, but for a start this is wrong ui = "x" + txt. Do you mean ui = x + '.txt' ? . Similarly data = open("ui").readlines() should be data = open(ui).readlines() –  arunkumar Aug 18 '11 at 3:29
1  
ui = str(x) + '.txt ' and open file as fp = open(x, 'r')` and data = fp.readlines() –  kracekumar Aug 18 '11 at 3:36
    
What's different here than using the shell: cp a.txt b.txt? –  Keith Aug 18 '11 at 3:43
    
@arunKumar: iv tried that m gettin IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: 'd' –  user899714 Aug 18 '11 at 3:53
    
@KraceKumar: if i input text file called 'mine'i get 'no such file or directory mine –  user899714 Aug 18 '11 at 3:56

2 Answers 2

for row in data: 
    row = row.strip().split(';')

The fact that you perform split(';') has for consequence that a row (you should write: line) split according to ';' gives always a not empty list, even if it is an empty line, and even after having been stripped with strip() : ''.split(';') gives [''] . So your following condition if row: is useless.

That means that your code is equivalent to:

for row in data:
    row = row.strip().split(';')
    for subrow in row:
        subrow = subrow.split()
        if subrow:
            out.writerow(subrow)

and then to:

for row in data:
    for subrow in  row.strip().split(';'):
        subrow = subrow.split()
        if subrow:
            out.writerow(subrow)

.

Moreover , the fact that you use split() on subrow present in the list row.strip().split(';') eliminates all the blanks before and after each of the words present in subrow. So the first strip() in row.strip().split(';') is useless too.

Your code is then equivalent to:

for row in data:
    for subrow in row.split(';'):
        subrow = subrow.split()
        if subrow:
            out.writerow(subrow)

Now , subrow.split() can produce a void list when subrow is only blanks, because split() without argument has its special algorithm. So the instruction if subrow is usefull.

.

In fact, what your code does is, after having read the content of such a file:

Blackcurrant, Redcurrant   ;  Orange ; Blueberry
    Pear;Chestnut;     Lemon Lime, Grapefruit
Apple;Apricot   ;  Pineapple, Fig; Mulberry, Hedge Apple

to record another file like that:

Blackcurrant
Redcurrant
Orange
Blueberry
Pear
Chestnut
Lemon Lime
Grapefruit
Apple
Apricot
Pineapple
Fig
Mulberry
Hedge
Apple

I prefer the following code to do that:

filename = raw_input("Enter name of file to be written row wise:") + '.txt'
filepath = 'I:\\' + filename

with open(filepath) as handler,open("myfile.csv","wb") as outfile:
    out = csv.writer(outfile)
    for row in handler:
        gen = ( subrow.split() for subrow in row.split(';') )
        out.writerow([x for x in gen if x])
    del out

.

This code will always run, even for files extremely huge whose content can't be held by the memory, because the lines of the file are read one after the other.

In case the file isn't enormous like that, it is possible to proceed like you did, with readlines():

with open(filepath) as handler:
    data = handler.readlines()

with open("myfile.csv","wb") as outfile:
    out = csv.writer(outfile)
    for row in data:
        gen = ( subrow.split() for subrow in row.split(';') )
        out.writerow([x for x in gen if x])
    del out

But there is no particular interest to proceed so, you can do for row in handler as well.

.

Personnaly, I think it would be better to use writerows():

filename = raw_input("Enter name of file to be written row wise:") + '.txt'
filepath = 'I:\\' + filename

with open(filepath) as handler,open("myfile.csv","wb") as outfile:
    out = csv.writer(outfile)
    gen = ( x for row in handler for x in (subrow.split() for subrow in row.split(';')) )
    out.writerows([x for x in gen if])
    del out

.

I end this answer by informing you that a code employing a regex would be far more efficient:

import csv, re

regx = re.compile('[ ;\r\n]+')

filename = raw_input("Enter name of file to be written row wise:") + '.txt'
filepath = 'I:\\' + filename

with open(filepath) as handler,open("myfile.txt","w") as outfile:
    outfile.write('\n'.join(x for x in regx.split(handler.read()) if x))

Edit 1

handler = open(filepath)
outfile = open("myfile.txt","wb")
out = csv.writer(outfile)
for row in handler:
    gen = ( subrow.split() for subrow in row.split(';') )
    out.writerow([x for x in gen if x])
del out
outfile.close()
handler.close()

or

import csv, re
regx = re.compile('[ ;\r\n]+')
filename = raw_input("Enter name of file to be written row wise:") + '.txt'
filepath = 'I:\\' + filename

handler = open(filepath)
outfile = open("myfile.txt","w") 
outfile.write('\n'.join(x for x in regx.split(handler.read()) if x))
outfile.close()
handler.close()
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, uv gotten the problem right..bt the prob here is that m usin python 2.5 and it doesnt accept 'with'...so what to do here? –  user899714 Aug 18 '11 at 11:26
    
@user899714 Is it really difficult to find what to do then ? How have you opened files in Python 2.5 until now ? see my update –  eyquem Aug 18 '11 at 11:46
    
yes i have opened them bt only csv files usin csv.reader but not text files. I recently discovered the code above to open a text file in Python. But it leaves a row while writing data from a text file into a csv file. That is the only prob that m facin. Both ur codes above are raisin an exception of 'No such file or directory' despite givin the correct path :( –  user899714 Aug 18 '11 at 16:27
    
@user899714 OK, I understand now: the file to read in is also a CSV file. To use a CSV file (reading or writing), one must create a file-object, like for any other file: f = open(csvfilepath,'rb') or f = open(csvfilename,'wb') ; a file-object constitutes the interface with the Operating System (I believe) that manages the files on disk. Then a CSV-reader object must be created with rid = csv.reader(f) or a CSV-writer object with ''writ = csv.writer(f)`` . Note that the file-object f must always be opened with binary mode: 'rb' or 'wb' , not 'r' or 'w' –  eyquem Aug 19 '11 at 4:31
    
@user899714 I don't understand what is it in the sentence "But it leaves a row while writing data from a text file into a csv file." And it shouldn't be leaves, I think, this verb here seems strange here –  eyquem Aug 19 '11 at 4:39

corrected code below

import sys,os,csv

x = raw_input("Enter name of file to be written row wise:")
input_filename = x + ".txt"
input_file = open(input_filename)
outfile = open("myfile.csv","wb")
out = csv.writer(outfile)
for row in input_file:
    row = row.strip().split(';')
    if row:
        for subrow in row:
            subrow = subrow.strip().split()
            if subrow:
                out.writerow(subrow)
input_file.close()
outfile.close()
share|improve this answer

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