Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the right way to malloc memory ? And what is the difference between them ?

void parse_cookies(const char *cookie, cookie_bank **my_cookie, int *cookies_num)
{
   *my_cookie = malloc(sizeof(cookie_bank) * 1);
   *my_cookie = (cookie_bank *)malloc(sizeof(cookie_bank) * 1);
   my_cookie = (cookie_bank **)malloc(sizeof(cookie_bank) * 1); 
   ///
}

I'm trying to malloc array of cookie_bank structs function.

share|improve this question
3  
Without knowing what you're trying to achieve, it's hard to say what's right. Remove the casts, though, those are definitely not right (i.e. they're unnecessary). –  Kerrek SB Aug 18 '11 at 3:40

3 Answers 3

I'm assuming that you want the function to allocate memory for an array and passing the result via a pointer parameter. So, you want to write T * x = malloc(...), and assign the result to a pointer argument, *y = x:

cookie_bank * myarray;
parse_cookies(..., &myarray, ...);
/* now have myarray[0], myarray[1], ... */

So the correct invocation should be, all rolled into one line,

parse_cookies(..., cookie_bank ** y, ...)
{
  *y = malloc(sizeof(cookie_bank) * NUMBER_OF_ELEMENTS);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much ! –  twoface88 Aug 18 '11 at 3:45

Your second example is the most correct. You don't need the *1 obviously.

*my_cookie = (cookie_bank *)malloc(sizeof(cookie_bank) * 1);

Your first example is also correct, although some compilers/flags will cause a complaint about the implicit cast from void*:

*my_cookie = malloc(sizeof(cookie_bank) * 1);

It you want to allocate more than one entry you'd generally use calloc() because it zeros the memory too:

*my_cookie = (cookie_bank*)calloc(sizeof(cookie_bank), 1);

your third example is just wrong:

my_cookie = (cookie_bank **)malloc(sizeof(cookie_bank) * 1); 

This will overwrite the local my_cookie pointer, and the memory will be lost on function return.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah that third one is just going to hurt...Second line is what you should be doing. –  LaceySnr Aug 18 '11 at 3:48
    
In particular, a C++ compiler will complain about the implicit cast from void. That's allowed in C but not in C++. –  Wyzard Aug 18 '11 at 3:55
    
@Wyzard: You shouldn't be using malloc in C++ anyway. –  Ryan Reich Aug 18 '11 at 4:13
    
No, but some people compile their C code with a C++ compiler, for whatever reason. Or they "write C" but they're really writing C++ and just not using most of the language's features. –  Wyzard Aug 18 '11 at 4:14
1  
This answer is bad advice, for reasons I have heard from comp.lang.c: first, the cast will hide a compiler warning if you forget to #include <stdlib.h> (the malloc function gets implicitly defined when it's called, and will return int, a non-pointer type). Second, it is unstable: if you decide to change the type of my_cookie later, you have to change it both in its declaration and in the malloc call. If you forget the latter, you potentially get a very odd bug. Malloc returns void* precisely because it is universally implicitly convertible to any other pointer type. –  Ryan Reich Aug 18 '11 at 4:17

I just would like to recommend you to read some C textbook. It seems to me that you do not have clear understanding on how pointers work in C language.

Anyway, here is some example to allocate memory with malloc.

#include <stdlib.h>

void parse_cookies(const char *cookie, cookie_bank **my_cookie, int *cookies_num)
{
    if (cookies_num == NULL || *cookies_num == 0) {
        return;
    }
    if (my_cookie == NULL) {
        my_cookie = (cookie_bank**)malloc(sizeof(cookie_bank*) * *cookies_num);
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < *cookies_num; i++) {
        *my_cookie = (cookie_bank*)malloc(sizeof(cookie_bank));
        my_cookie++;
    }
}

Of course, this example does not cover any error handling. Basically, my_cookie is pointer to pointer which means my_cookie is just pointer to point memory location where it holds array of pointers. The first malloc allocate the memory using size of pointer and requested number of cookie structure. Then second malloc actually allocate memory for each structure.

The problem of this function is that it can easily cause memory leak unless using this very carefully.

Anyway, it is important to understand how C pointer works.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.