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So apparently on my machine, float, double and long double each have different sizes each. There also doesn't seem to be a strict standard enforcing how many bytes each of those types would have to be.

How would one, then, save a floating point value into a binary file, and then have it read properly on a different system if the sizes differ? e.g my machine has 8 byte doubles, whereas joe's have 12 byte doubles.

Without having to export it in text form (e.g "0.3232"), that is. Seems a lot less compact than the binary representation.

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2  
Why can't you use the string representation, even if it seems bloatet? It's definitely very easy and portable, which are important things. –  Roland Illig Aug 18 '11 at 7:36
3  
Of course, "0.3232\0" needs only 7 bytes, which is already less than you need for your average double (eight). So maybe text form isn't that bad after all (and it's nice for debuggin, too). –  Frerich Raabe Aug 18 '11 at 7:37
2  
Since the binary size is 4 - 12 bytes per value then using text doesn't seem particularly inefficient, plus it's a lot more portable, more robust, easier to debug, easier to support in terms of backward compatibility, and as a bonus it can make your data files readable/writable by other programs if needed. –  Paul R Aug 18 '11 at 7:37
1  
With regards to using text: for a round trip without loss of precision in IEEE double, you need 17 digits in decimal. Plus the exponent and the sign, and probably separators as well (since the format doesn't have a fixed width). It's still the preferred format, but it does require more space (and usually, more time to convert). –  James Kanze Aug 18 '11 at 8:35
1  
@MSalters I presume by hexadecimal, you mean a hex dump of the bytes in the double. This seems to me to combine the worst of both formats: it's not human readable, and it is machine dependent, but it still takes twice the space as binary (16 bytes, as opposed to 21/22 for normal text). –  James Kanze Aug 18 '11 at 8:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have to define a format, and implement that. Typically, most of the network protocols I know use IEEE float and double, output big-endian (but other formats are possible). The advantage of using IEEE formats is that it is what most of the current everyday machines use internally; if you're on one of these machines (and portability of your code to other machines, like mainframes, isn't an issue), you can "convert" to the format simply by type-punning to an unsigned int of the same size, and outputting that. So, for example, you might have:

obstream&
operator<<( obstream& dest, uint64_t value )
{
    dest.put((value >> 56) & 0xFF);
    dest.put((value >> 48) & 0xFF);
    dest.put((value >> 40) & 0xFF);
    dest.put((value >> 32) & 0xFF);
    dest.put((value >> 24) & 0xFF);
    dest.put((value >> 16) & 0xFF);
    dest.put((value >>  8) & 0xFF);
    dest.put((value      ) & 0xFF);
    return dest;
}

obstream&
operator<<( obstream& dest, double value )
{
    return dest << reinterpret_cast<uint64_t const&>( value );
}

If you have to be portable to a machine not supporting IEEE (e.g. any of the modern mainframes), you'll need something a bit more complicated:

obstream&
obstream::operator<<( obstream& dest, double value )
{
    bool                isNeg = value < 0;
    if ( isNeg ) {
        value = - value;
    }
    int                 exp;
    if ( value == 0.0 ) {
        exp = 0;
    } else {
        value = ldexp( frexp( value, &exp ), 53 );
        exp += 1022;
    }
    uint64_t mant = static_cast< uint64_t >( value );
    dest.put( (isNeg ? 0x80 : 0x00) | exp >> 4 );
    dest.put( ((exp << 4) & 0xF0) | ((mant >> 48) & 0x0F) );
    dest.put( mant >> 40 );
    dest.put( mant >> 32 );
    dest.put( mant >> 24 );
    dest.put( mant >> 16 );
    dest.put( mant >>  8 );
    dest.put( mant       );
    return dest;
}

(Note that this doesn't handle NaN's and infinities correctly. Personally, I would ban them from the format, since not all floating point representations support them. But then, there's no floating point format on an IBM mainframe which will support 1E306, either, although you can encode it in the IEEE double format above.)

Reading is, of course, the opposite. Either:

ibstream&
operator>>( ibstream& source, uint64_t& results )
{
    uint64_t value = (source.get() & 0xFF) << 56;
    value |= (source.get() & 0xFF) << 48;
    value |= (source.get() & 0xFF) << 40;
    value |= (source.get() & 0xFF) << 32;
    value |= (source.get() & 0xFF) << 24;
    value |= (source.get() & 0xFF) << 16;
    value |= (source.get() & 0xFF) <<  8;
    value |= (source.get() & 0xFF)      ;
    if ( source )
        results = value;
    return source;
}

ibstream&
operator>>( ibstream& source, double& results)
{
    uint64_t tmp;
    source >> tmp;
    if ( source )
        results = reinterpret_cast<double const&>( tmp );
    return source;
}

or if you can't count on IEEE:

ibstream&
ibstream::operator>>( ibstream& source, double& results )
{
    uint64_t tmp;
    source >> tmp;
    if ( source ) {
        double f = 0.0;
        if ( (tmp & 0x7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF) != 0 ) {
            f = ldexp( ((tmp & 0x000FFFFFFFFFFFFF) | 0x0010000000000000),
                       static_cast<int>( (tmp & 0x7FF0000000000000) >> 52 )
                                - 1022 - 53 );
        }
        if ( (tmp & 0x8000000000000000) != 0 ) {
            f = -f;
        }
        dest = f;
    }
    return source;
}

(This assumes that the input is not an NaN or an infinity.)

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+1 ( note: source in the second code snippet means value ? ) –  user396672 Aug 18 '11 at 8:12
    
@user397772 Yes. I edited the code from an old project, and apparently mis-edited some things. (I'll edit my post to fix it.) –  James Kanze Aug 18 '11 at 8:30

You could store them in a format that is machine-independent. For that you first have to convert it from your representation to the other.

A simple kind of conversion is to analyze the number into a triple (sign, exponent, significand), and save these as whole numbers. That way you can keep the full precision.

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You could use Boost serialization http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_47_0/libs/serialization/doc/index.html which can serialize to text, xml, or binary.

Otherwise you can do it manually, for example like this:

  • you agree to little endian (and check whether the machine is little or big endian and than do a recalculation)
  • you write one byte, how many byte long the floating point number is
  • then you write the float to the stream - as little endian
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2  
Boost doesn't solve OP's problem, boost binary archives are not portable, and the OP said he doesn't want to use text representation so text and xml doesn't work for him either. –  ybungalobill Aug 18 '11 at 7:33
    
When you save the rerpresenting bits on one system and then load them on another incompatible system, the value of the number will be lost. You should really concentrate on saving the value and loading it back later into whatever representation is needed on the other system. –  Roland Illig Aug 18 '11 at 7:35
    
@ybungalobill Ok, I did not know that, thanks for the info! –  Markus Pilman Aug 18 '11 at 7:43
    
@Roland Illig: why should the value of the number be lost? And which value? If you make sure, that you always read and write little endian, you can easily implement a serializer and deserializer for each system. This could be all in the same code, testing first for little vs big endian (can be done in one line C-Code) and than testing for the sizes of the available floats on the system. –  Markus Pilman Aug 18 '11 at 7:47
1  
@Markus Pilman There is a lot more variation in floating point formats than just little endian and big endian; I've seen at least three different byte orders for four byte longs. And what would you do about systems where doubles have 48 bits, or 36, or are simply base 16? –  James Kanze Aug 18 '11 at 7:52

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