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Following is the code that works fine

class HttpService {
public:
    virtual ~HttpService(); // implemented in .cpp
protected:
    HttpService(struct MHD_Connection *conn) {}
};
class HttpFileService : public HttpService
{
public:
    virtual ~HttpFileService() ; // implemented in .cpp
protected:
    HttpFileService(struct MHD_Connection *conn) : HttpService(conn) {}
};

Now, when I make HttpService a derived class of QObject, like below:

#include <QObject>                      // change #1
class HttpService  : public QObject {   // change #2
    Q_OBJECT                            // change #3
public:
    virtual ~HttpService();
protected:
    HttpService(struct MHD_Connection *conn) {}
};

class HttpFileService : public HttpService {
    Q_OBJECT                            // change #4
public:
    virtual ~HttpFileService() ;
protected:
    HttpFileService(struct MHD_Connection *conn) : HttpService(conn) {}
};

I encounter the following linking error:

Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64:
  "vtable for HttpService", referenced from:
      HttpService::~HttpService()in httpservice.o

Changing HttpService's constructor to the following doesn't help either

explicit HttpService(QObject *parent = 0) : QObject(parent)
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1  
~HttpService() is still implemented in .cpp file after the code change ? I am asking this because, in the changed code, I don't see the comment as // implemented in .cpp. –  iammilind Aug 18 '11 at 7:52
    
@iammilind, Yes it still is. The only lines that were changed are highlighted in the comments –  S B Aug 18 '11 at 7:55
2  
Is that the whole of HttpService()? I often see this error if I declare a virtual function in an abstract base class, and forget to make it pure. (gcc generates the vtable in the same object file as the first non-pure, non-inline virtual function, if such a function is declared, and if that doesn't have a definition then it will end up missing). –  Mike Seymour Aug 18 '11 at 7:55
1  
@mike-seymour, Good point! This is indeed not the entire class, but I double checked and what you said does not seem to be the case here. Also, why would the code not break prior to deriving it from QObject? –  S B Aug 18 '11 at 8:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Force running qmake and see if it works.

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Whoa! <padding> –  Rafael Vega Feb 23 at 18:26

Are you linking to the correct qt libraries?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, There are other QObject-derived classes in my project which are going through just fine –  S B Aug 18 '11 at 7:48

Are you calling the moc-compiler? If not, remove the Q_OBJECT macros! And do you include / link the results from the moc-compilation?

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