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Could you tell me why a = (b>0) ? 1 : 0 results in more efficient code than if (b>0)a=1; else a =0;, in CUDA?

Please give details.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In general, I would recommend to write CUDA code in a natural style, and let the compiler worry about local branching. Besides predication, the GPU hardware also implements "select" type instructions. Using talonmies's framework and sticking in the original poster's code, I find that the same machine code is produced for both versions with the CUDA 4.0 compiler for sm_20. I used -keep to retain intermediate files, and the cuobjdump utility to produce the disassembly. Both the ternary operator and the if-statement are translated into an FCMP instruction, which is a "select" instruction.

The sample case examined by talonmies is actually a special case. The compiler recognizes some common source code idioms, such as the particular ternary expression frequently used to express max() and min() operations, and generates code accordingly. The equivalent if-statement is not recognized as an idiom.

__global__ void branchTest0(float *bp, float *d) 
{         
    unsigned int tidx = threadIdx.x + blockDim.x*blockIdx.x;
    float b = bp[tidx];
    float a = (b>0)?1:0;
    d[tidx] = a;
} 

__global__ void branchTest1(float *bp, float *d)
{
    unsigned int tidx = threadIdx.x + blockDim.x*blockIdx.x;
    float b = bp[tidx];
    float a;
    if (b>0)a=1; else a =0;
    d[tidx] = a;
}

code for sm_20
        Function : _Z11branchTest1PfS_
/*0000*/     /*0x00005de428004404*/     MOV R1, c [0x1] [0x100];
/*0008*/     /*0x84009c042c000000*/     S2R R2, SR_Tid_X;
/*0010*/     /*0x94001c042c000000*/     S2R R0, SR_CTAid_X;
/*0018*/     /*0x10019de218000000*/     MOV32I R6, 0x4;
/*0020*/     /*0x20009ca320044000*/     IMAD R2, R0, c [0x0] [0x8], R2;
/*0028*/     /*0x1020dc435000c000*/     IMUL.U32.U32.HI R3, R2, 0x4;
/*0030*/     /*0x80211c03200d8000*/     IMAD.U32.U32 R4.CC, R2, R6, c [0x0] [0x20];
/*0038*/     /*0x90315c4348004000*/     IADD.X R5, R3, c [0x0] [0x24];
/*0040*/     /*0xa0209c03200d8000*/     IMAD.U32.U32 R2.CC, R2, R6, c [0x0] [0x28];
/*0048*/     /*0x00401c8584000000*/     LD.E R0, [R4];
/*0050*/     /*0xb030dc4348004000*/     IADD.X R3, R3, c [0x0] [0x2c];
/*0058*/     /*0x03f01c003d80cfe0*/     FCMP.LEU R0, RZ, 0x3f800, R0;
/*0060*/     /*0x00201c8594000000*/     ST.E [R2], R0;
/*0068*/     /*0x00001de780000000*/     EXIT;
        ....................................


        Function : _Z11branchTest0PfS_
/*0000*/     /*0x00005de428004404*/     MOV R1, c [0x1] [0x100];
/*0008*/     /*0x84009c042c000000*/     S2R R2, SR_Tid_X;
/*0010*/     /*0x94001c042c000000*/     S2R R0, SR_CTAid_X;
/*0018*/     /*0x10019de218000000*/     MOV32I R6, 0x4;
/*0020*/     /*0x20009ca320044000*/     IMAD R2, R0, c [0x0] [0x8], R2;
/*0028*/     /*0x1020dc435000c000*/     IMUL.U32.U32.HI R3, R2, 0x4;
/*0030*/     /*0x80211c03200d8000*/     IMAD.U32.U32 R4.CC, R2, R6, c [0x0] [0x20];
/*0038*/     /*0x90315c4348004000*/     IADD.X R5, R3, c [0x0] [0x24];
/*0040*/     /*0xa0209c03200d8000*/     IMAD.U32.U32 R2.CC, R2, R6, c [0x0] [0x28];
/*0048*/     /*0x00401c8584000000*/     LD.E R0, [R4];
/*0050*/     /*0xb030dc4348004000*/     IADD.X R3, R3, c [0x0] [0x2c];
/*0058*/     /*0x03f01c003d80cfe0*/     FCMP.LEU R0, RZ, 0x3f800, R0;
/*0060*/     /*0x00201c8594000000*/     ST.E [R2], R0;
/*0068*/     /*0x00001de780000000*/     EXIT;
        ....................................
share|improve this answer

There was a time when the NVIDIA compiler generated more efficient code for the ternary operator than if/then/else constructs. This is the results of a small test to see whether this is still the case:

__global__ void branchTest0(float *a, float *b, float *d)
{
        unsigned int tidx = threadIdx.x + blockDim.x*blockIdx.x;
        float aval = a[tidx], bval = b[tidx];
        float z0 = (aval > bval) ? aval : bval;

        d[tidx] = z0;
}

__global__ void branchTest1(float *a, float *b, float *d)
{
        unsigned int tidx = threadIdx.x + blockDim.x*blockIdx.x;
        float aval = a[tidx], bval = b[tidx];
        float z0;

        if (aval > bval) {
            z0 = aval;
        } else {
            z0 = bval;
        }
        d[tidx] = z0;
}

Compiling these two kernels for compute capability 2.0 with the CUDA 4.0 release compiler, the comparison section produces this:

branchTest0:
max.f32         %f3, %f1, %f2;

and

branchTest1:
setp.gt.f32     %p1, %f1, %f2;
selp.f32        %f3, %f1, %f2, %p1;

The ternary operator gets compiled into a single floating point maximum instruction, whereas the if/then/else gets compiled into two instructions, a compare followed by a select. Both codes are conditionally executed - neither produces branching. The machine code emitted by the assembler for these is also different and closely replicated the PTX:

branchTest0:
    /*0070*/     /*0x00201c00081e0000*/     FMNMX R0, R2, R0, !pt;

and

branchTest1:
    /*0070*/     /*0x0021dc00220e0000*/     FSETP.GT.AND P0, pt, R2, R0, pt;
    /*0078*/     /*0x00201c0420000000*/     SEL R0, R2, R0, P0;

So it would seem that, at least for Fermi GPUs with CUDA 4.0 with this sort of construct, the ternary operator does produce fewer instructions that an equivalent if/then/else. Whether there is a performance difference between them comes down to microbenchmarking data which I don't have.

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Thank you for your details. –  Yik Aug 18 '11 at 9:17

In general you need to avoid branches in CUDA code, otherwise you may get warp divergence which can result in a big performance hit. if/else clauses will normally result in branches based on a test of an expression. One way of eliminating branches is to use an expression which can be implemented without branches if the compiler is smart enough - that way all the threads in a warp follow the same code path.

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"if the compiler is smart enough" That's the main point. IMHO, the compiler should be able to compile it to without-branch operations, whatever way you write it. The compiler must know to avoid branches, and optimize accordingly. –  Didier Trosset Aug 18 '11 at 9:09
    
Thanks for your answer. –  Yik Aug 18 '11 at 9:16
1  
You do not need to avoid all branches, that just makes the code far more complex than it needs to be. You should have a good understanding of your code and take steps to minimise divergence. A uniform branch (where all threads take the same route) does not have a performance hit. A short branch can be implemented with predication, with minimal performance hit. Long divergent branches are the only case that incur a penalty - lifting common subexpressions out of the branches can help, as the programmer you have a much better understanding than the compiler of how expressions can be refactored. –  Tom Aug 18 '11 at 9:16

In both cases the compiler is going to try to do the same thing, it will aim to use predicated execution. You can find more information in the CUDA C Programming Guide (available via the website) and also on Wikipedia. Essentially for short branches such as this the hardware is able to emit instructions for both sides of the branch and use a predicate to indicate which threads should actually execute the instructions.

In other words, there would be minimal performance difference. With older compilers the tertiary operator sometimes helped, but nowadays they are equivalent.

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Except that there is a difference, see my reply above...... –  talonmies Aug 18 '11 at 9:14
    
Thanks for running the experiment - changed to indicate the difference is minimal. If the kernel is just doing the assignment over again then it would be noticeable but hopefully he's doing something far more interesting than that! –  Tom Aug 18 '11 at 9:19
    
@Tom Agreed. This whole question stems from an "optimize as you write" mindset, which will significantly reduce your productivity and probably have other negative effects. However, if you do happen to be tuning a code path that your profiler says is a high percentage, then yes, see if ternary operator is less cycles :-) –  doug65536 Jan 2 '13 at 8:58

Don't know for CUDA, but in C++ and C99, using the former you can initialize a const variable.

int const a = (b>0) ? 1 : 0;

Whereas with the latter, you cannot make your a variable const as you have to declare it before the if.

Note that it could be written even shorter:

int const a = (b>0);

And you could even remove the parenthesis ... but IMHO it does not improve reading.

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I heard from one of the specialist who told me "a = (b>0) ? 1 : 0;" could improve performance in CUDA. I am very confused. –  Yik Aug 18 '11 at 8:31
    
It's nothing to do with consts - it's about eliminating branches in SIMT code. –  Paul R Aug 18 '11 at 8:48

I find it easier to read. It's immediately obvious that the purpose of the whole statement is to set the value of a.

The intent is to assign a to one of two values, and the ternary conditional operator syntax lets you have only one a = in your statement.

I think a standard if/else all on one line is ugly (regardless of what it's used for).

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Thank you. That makes sense for improving appearance. Someone told me that it improves performance as well. –  Yik Aug 18 '11 at 8:33
    
It's not about code clarity, it's about performance in a SIMT architecture such as CUDA where you get warp divergence on conditional blocks. –  Paul R Aug 18 '11 at 8:47
    
No reason you can't have performance and code clarity (at least in this case). And that syntax is familiar to anyone from a C, Java, JavaScript or C# background (amongst others). –  nnnnnn Aug 18 '11 at 23:52

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