Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way to automatically update R on Mac OS X to the latest patched version (R-Patched) on a daily basis or some predetermined intervals?

share|improve this question

migrated from stats.stackexchange.com Aug 18 '11 at 8:57

This question came from our site for people interested in statistics, machine learning, data analysis, data mining, and data visualization.

2 Answers 2

My impression is that compiling from source is the most (only?) reliable way to get the most recent patched version, but I could be wrong about this. A simple shell script to download the latest patched version and recompile would be:

curl -o /tmp/R-patched.tar.gz ftp://ftp.stat.math.ethz.ch/Software/R/R-patched.tar.gz
tar xzvf /tmp/R-patched.tar.gz
cd /tmp/R-patched
./configure
make
cp bin/R <old_R_binary_location>

You could then use crontab to run this at regular intervals. I don't find the crontab man page to be very helpful, so I always end up referring back to guides such as this one.

share|improve this answer
    
When doing this you'd probably want to copy over your old library of installed packages somehow, or add lines to the daily script to download and install those packages. –  Mike Aug 18 '11 at 13:19
1  
Re: crontab -> you can use the gui app cronniX (code.google.com/p/cronnix) to manage the scheduling. –  Mike Aug 18 '11 at 13:20

I have a bash script that installs the daily patched build from http://r.research.att.com. Installed libraries remain untouched, except for those in core.

I update manually, but you could set up a cron job as @bnaul suggests. I'm not sure how it will handle the need for sudo'ing, however. You might have to move your R out of /Library/Frameworks and then change the script accordingly.

#!/bin/bash
curl -s http://r.research.att.com/R-2.13-branch-leopard-universal.tar.gz | sudo tar fvxz - -C /
share|improve this answer
    
Good point; sudo doesn't ask for a password on my machine (livin' on the edge!) so I often forget about this. –  bnaul Aug 18 '11 at 17:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.