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Tweet! for jQuery works fine most of the time, but sporadically I get this:

"NetworkError: 400 Bad Request - http://api.twitter.com/1/statuses/user_timeline.json?screen_name=jlowgren&count=5&include_rts=1&page=1&callback=jQuery16202827138555332698_1313661810432&_=1313661810465

This is the jQuery call:

$(".tweet").tweet({
    username: "jlowgren",
    count: 5,
    loading_text: "Loading tweets…",
    refresh_interval: 120
});

The site in question is www.jorum.se.

Anyone with a handsome solution for this will be richly rewarded in karma!

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On the rate limit, consider that on your local machine you may be requesting the twitter API more then realize in addition to the 30 requests per hour you're sending through the widget. A lot of websites are beginning to use the AJAX API's with intervals. –  Chamilyan Aug 19 '11 at 9:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like your getting rate limited.

If your application is being rate-limited by the REST API it will receive HTTP 400 response codes. It is best practice for applications to monitor their current rate limit status and dynamically throttle requests if necessary. The REST API offers two ways to observe this status which are explained in the Rate Limiting FAQ.

  • Authenticated (oAuth) requests have a limit of 350 / hour requests

while . .

  • Non authenticated requests have a limit of 150 / hour requests

to see your current rate limit status, send a GET request to

http://api.twitter.com/1/account/rate_limit_status.json


See this page for further context

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Under the assumption that the site gets a lot of traffic, would it be correct to assume that the only way of getting around rating would be to store the last known results on the server and display those, should a 400 response occur? –  jorum Aug 19 '11 at 12:16
1  
not exactly. This is actually not really an issue you really need to worry about at all. What your seeing is all local to your machine. Unless you suspect another user is polling twitter as much as you are on your local machine then you have nothing to worry about. Traffic to your website has actually nothing to do with this. I think your OK with 30 requests an hour per machine for polling the API. –  Chamilyan Aug 19 '11 at 16:39
1  
.. but to be on the safe side, if you want, try doing what amelvin suggested below in case the API fails for a heavy user. Keep in mind that they would need to have a lot of websites open besides yours to see the issue. It doesn't hurt to do as you suggested and send them the last known data cached by your server but that seems like a lot of overhead. Maybe you can get away with a hold up, loading new data message. –  Chamilyan Aug 19 '11 at 16:56
    
Alrighty, you've been a great help, thanks! –  jorum Aug 19 '11 at 17:40

It works fine for me all the time (after few refreshes). Isn't there limit per IP ?

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Just a limit of requests per hour afaik, but that's what the refresh_interval is for, I hope. –  jorum Aug 18 '11 at 12:07

I think that you should always assume that the Twitter network will occasionally fail (it always has done to date). So wrap your jquery tweet call in a javascript try catch.

try {  
    $(".tweet").tweet({
    username: "jlowgren",
    count: 5,
    loading_text: "Loading tweets…",
    refresh_interval: 120
});
} catch (error) {  
    // error message or other response goes here  
}  
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll give that a whirl when I get back from work. I guess to fix the actual problem permanently would involve me cashing the results in case the error occurs. –  jorum Aug 18 '11 at 12:09

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