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I have the following code:

SqlDataReader reader = getAddressQuery.sqlReader;
while (reader.Read())
{
    foreach (Object ob in reader)
    {
        someText.InnerText = someText.InnerText + " " + ob.ToString();
    }
}

The code in the foreach loop does not execute. However, I can do this:

SqlDataReader reader = getAddressQuery.sqlReader;
while (reader.Read())
{
    someText.InnerText = reader[0].ToString();
}

Which works.

Obviously I could achieve the same result using a regular for loop rather than a foreach loop, but I think the foreach syntax is clearer, so I use it when possible.

What has gone wrong here? Are foreach loops in c# not as flexible as in more high level languages?

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I don't know for sure but I assume the foreach is iterating through each field in the recordset rather than each record... –  Chris Aug 18 '11 at 11:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Something like the following. Note that IDataReader derives from IDataRecord which exposes the members used to process the current row:

IEnumerable<IDataRecord> GetFromReader(IDataReader reader)
{
    while(reader.Read()) yield return reader;
}

foreach(IDataRecord record in GetFromReader(reader))
{
    ... process it ...
}

Or even something like the following, to get an enumeration or list of strongly-typed entity objects from a reader:

IEnumerable<T> GetFromReader<T>(IDataReader reader, Func<IDataRecord, T> processRecord)
{
    while(reader.Read()) yield return processRecord(reader);
}

MyType GetMyTypeFromRecord(IDataRecord record)
{
    MyType myType = new MyType();
    myType.SomeProperty = record[0];
    ...
    return myType;
}

IList<MyType> myResult = GetFromReader(reader, GetMyTypeFromRecord).ToList();
share|improve this answer

The foreach exposes an IDataRecord, which puts you in a very similar boat to the while loop:

using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(""))
using (SqlCommand comm = new SqlCommand("select * from somewhere", conn))
{
    conn.Open();

    using (var r = comm.ExecuteReader())
    {
        foreach (DbDataRecord s in r)
        {
            string val = s.GetString(0);
        }
    }
}

If you want to see something more useful, you'll need to have some of your own code that extracts the values from the record into something more custom, as the other answer has suggested.

Either way you are going to need custom code, whether you have it inline or not or use a while loop or not depends on how often it's going to be written I suppose, any more than once and you should probably stick it in a helper method somewhere.

And to answer the somewhat question: the problem is not the foreach, it is your attempted usage of what it returns for you, as your comparable use of the while loop is not actually comparable.

share|improve this answer
    
I see. That is a bit annoying. –  Oliver Aug 18 '11 at 10:57
    
@Marc rectified. –  Adam Houldsworth Aug 18 '11 at 11:14
    
@Marc "wrong - SqlDataReader does implement IEnumerable" - yes, but this enumerates the columns of the (current) IDataRecord, not the rows. –  Joe Aug 18 '11 at 11:15
    
@Joe on the SqlDataReader it appears to be returning entire records. –  Adam Houldsworth Aug 18 '11 at 11:17
    
@Joe what he said ;p –  Marc Gravell Aug 18 '11 at 11:21

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