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I have this structure:

///Creep.java///
public interface Creep extends Movable<Position2D> {
  ...
}


///Movable.java///
public interface Movable<T extends Position2D> {
        ...
    void setMovementStrategy(MovementStrategy<Movable<T>> movementStrategy);
    MovementStrategy<Movable<T>> getMovementStrategy();
}


///MovementStrategy.java///
public interface MovementStrategy<T extends Movable<? extends Position2D>> {
  void executeMovement(T movable);
}


///CreepImpl.java///
public class CreepImpl implements Creep {
...

 @Override
 public void setMovementStrategy(MovementStrategy<Creep> movementStrategy) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub

 }

 @Override
 public MovementStrategy<Creep> getMovementStrategy() {
    return null;
 }

}

My problem is that generics doesn't like MovementStrategy<Creep> but it does accept MovementStrategy<Movable<Position2D>> Which i think is strange as Creep extends Movable<Position2D>. This in the context of the methods public MovementStrategy<Creep> getMovementStrategy() and public MovementStrategy<Creep> getMovementStrategy()

Isn't this possible? or maybe im doing something wrong?

Any help is appreciated!

EDIT

Forgot to include MovementStrategy source.. doh!

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is the error you're getting, and in which line of code? –  Michael Borgwardt Aug 18 '11 at 11:02
    
Well, no error, more of an eclipse warning and a red colored underline :) . My question was more in the line of why isn't MovementStrategy<Movable<Position2D>> equal to MovementStrategy<Creep> when Creep is a more specific type of Movable<Position2D> –  netbrain Aug 18 '11 at 11:11
1  
btw, MovementStrategy should not be generic. It would always work with Movable objects, –  Bozho Aug 18 '11 at 11:15
    
How did you declare the MovementStrategy class/interface? My guess is you used the wrong declaration there. –  Dorus Aug 18 '11 at 11:21
    
Red colored underline means a compiler error (visible in the "Problems" view, or if you hover the mouse over the underlined code). And the answer depends on the context of how you're trying to use the type. Show us the actual problematic code and the actual error already! –  Michael Borgwardt Aug 18 '11 at 11:25
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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Probably you don't even need generics with MovementStrategy. Try not to create that much generics complexity.


Original answer: You can use the extends keyword: MovementStrategy<? extends Movable>

This is needed to preserve compile-time safety.

Imagine the following was possible: Creep extends Movable, Wind extends Movable

MovementStrategy<Movable> strategy = new MovementStrategy<Wind>();
strategy.setTargetObject(new Creep()); //fails

The 2nd like fails at runtime, because it expects Wind, but you give it a Creep

share|improve this answer
    
but why this? what's the reason for which the compiler need "? extends Creep" instead that simply "Creep"? –  Heisenbug Aug 18 '11 at 11:04
1  
to preserve compile-time safety. I'll add an explanation –  Bozho Aug 18 '11 at 11:05
    
MovementStrategy is an interface defined as follows public interface MovementStrategy<T extends Movable<? extends Position2D>> Changing T to ? as you suggested results in IDE warnings/errors. –  netbrain Aug 18 '11 at 11:17
    
As you suggested, the solution was to remove generics on MovementStrategy interface as i didn't need it. But thanks for clearing this up for me.! –  netbrain Aug 18 '11 at 11:28
    
Actually if this was possible, i do not think the strategy.setTargetObject(new Creep()) will fail at runtime... It would fail later –  Sebastien Lorber Aug 18 '11 at 12:10
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Take this sample code:

Movable<Position2D> moveable = new CreepImpl();
MovementStrategy<Movable<Position2D>> strategy=/*some strategy here */;
moveable.setMovementStrategy(strategy);

Since CreepImpl only accepts MovementStrategy<Creep>, the last line should fail, although it is perfectly legal, which means that CreepImpl is not a valid substitute for Moveable<Position2D>

In Java, when B extends or implements A, every Object of type B can also be assigned to a variable of type A, and B may not introduce any constraints to limit A.

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Thanks, you gave me an "aha" moment ;) –  netbrain Aug 18 '11 at 11:22
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Your problem is that Creep implements the interface Movable<Position2D>, and Movable<Position2D> expect the methods setMovementStrategy(MovementStrategy<Movable<Position2D>> movementStrategy) and MovementStrategy<Movable<T>> getMovementStrategy().

Look at this simple non-generic example:

public interface iTest() {
  doSomething(Object o);
}

public class Test implements iTest {
  @Overide
  doSomething(Test t) {
    //error
  }
}

As you can see, doSomething(Test t) only implements a small part of the iTest interface. If somebody writes the folling code, there is no method in Test to execute it:

public class TestImpl {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    iTest t = new Test();
    t.doSomething("Hi"); // valid, because iTest.doSomething() expects a Object, and String is a Object.
    Test t2 = new Test();
    t2.doSomething("Hi"); // invalid, Test does not have a doSomething(String).
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I solved it by removing the uneeded generics. but thanks! –  netbrain Aug 18 '11 at 11:42
add comment

Polymorphism doesn't work for generics like for arrays for exemple.

The JVM doesn't know at runtime the type of the object, this is called type erasure and was done for retrocompatibility. Only the compiler knows the type of an instance.

Generics were designed mostly for collections... The matter is that you must know that it IS possible to insert a String to a List, if you pass for exemple an ArrayList of integers to a method taking a List

Give a try to the following code that will surprise you:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
    for ( int i=0 ; i<10 ; i++ ) {
        set.add(i);
    }
    methode(set);
    for ( Integer i : set ) {
        System.out.println(i);
    }
}
public static void methode(Set set) {
    set.add("test");
}

It does compile, run and even give some numbers before raising an exception!

Now let's review the following code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
    for ( int i=0 ; i<10 ; i++ ) {
        set.add(i);
    }
    methode(set); // NOK
    for ( Integer i : set ) {
        System.out.println(i);
    }
}
public static void methode(Set<Number> set) {
    set.add(3f);
}

It's almost the same here, if polymorphism was ok with generics, you could pass a set of integers to a method that takes a set of numbers, and then add a float to the set of integers!

Sun designed generics so that if you do not use legacy non typed code, your collections keep being type safe...

Like Bozho said, in my exemple you could use as argument

Set<? extends Number>

and thus it would be possible to pass a set of integers to the method. I don't remember exactly, but in this case i think java gives you a warning on the danger of inserting a new item to that list...

share|improve this answer
    
Note that with arrays, the type of the array is known at runtime, so if you try to add a bad value to an array, you'll get an ArrayStoreException, while with Collections you can add a Float, and the error you will get will probably be a ClassCastException while iterating over the list –  Sebastien Lorber Aug 18 '11 at 11:15
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