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I have a navigation bar with images, like so:

<ul>
  <li class="me">
    <span class="cont"><img src="dummy.png" /></span>
  </li>
  <li class="me">
    <span class="cont"><img src="dummy.png" /></span>
  </li>
</ul>

On hovering over a list item I want to change the background color to cover the span and image like so:

.me {background-color: none;}
.me:hover {background-color: rgba(150,150,150,0.5);}

Problem is, the image does not get covered... Is this because the background is in fact... a "background" on which child elements are sitting? If so, how could I achieve this effect with plain CSS?

EDIT - solution

this worked with my original HTML structure:

<ul>
  <li>
   <a href="" class="ui-btn">
     <span class="ui-btn-inner"> /* CONTAINS IMAGE AS BACKGROUND */
        <span class="ui-btn-text">text</span>  /* GETS BACKGROUND */
        <span class="ui-icon"></span>
     </span>
   </a>
 </li>
</ul>

"Negative logic": If I assign the background to list item, it sits behind all child elements, so I figured I needed to assign the background to an element that is a child of the element containing the img to have it appear above all items. span ui-btn-inner contains the image, so setting the :hover background on span ui-btn-text makes it appear above the image... weird, but works.

share|improve this question
1  
yes background is behind child elements –  Fender Aug 18 '11 at 11:24
2  
<img="dummy.png">? –  thirtydot Aug 18 '11 at 11:24
    
It should be <img src="dummy.png" alt="Picture of a dummy.">. –  user142019 Aug 18 '11 at 11:26
    
@WTP: correct, shortened too much... :-) –  frequent Aug 18 '11 at 11:31
    
@tw16: I cannot hide the image, because the hover should just add a shade on the list item –  frequent Aug 18 '11 at 11:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, it's because the background is in fact a background. The best method to achieve this in raw css would be to continue using the background:

.me
{
    background-color: none;
    background-image: url(dummy.png);
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
}
.me:hover
{
    background-color: rgba(150,150,150,0.5);
    background-image: ;
}

You could also achieve this effect with a bit of javascript as well.

<ul>
  <li class="me">
    <span class="cont"><img="dummy.png" onmouseover='this.src="sometransparent.gif";' onmouseout='this.src="dummy.png";'></span>
  </li>
  <li class="me">
    <span class="cont"><img="dummy.png"" onmouseover='this.src="sometransparent.gif";' onmouseout='this.src="dummy.png";></span>
  </li>
</ul>

Code not tested. It might require tweaking to get it just right.

Edit: Layering concept
None of this pseudo-code is test, but I've done it before so it may just take a bit of tweaking. I don't have a copy of the original I did on hand so I'll have to wing it. The first step is to create a relative container and 2 sub containers.

.meContainer
{
    position: relative;
    width: 100px;
    height: 30px;   /* I usually specify height/width for these things */
}

.meContainerLink
{
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;        /* You need to use position to get them to overlap */
    z-index: 1;     /* Provide a layer */
}

.meContainerAlpha
{
    position: absolute;
    top: -30px;     /* Move it UP 30px */
    left: 0px;
    z-index: 2;     /* Place it on top of the other layer */
    display: none;  /* Hide it */
    background-color: rgba(150,150,150,0.5);   
}

.meContainerAlpha:hover
{
    display: inline; /* Show it */
}

Then you'd need to place these in divs inside your <li>.

<ul>
  <li class="me">
    <div class="meContainer">
        <div class="meContainerLink">
            <img="dummy.png">
        </div>
        <div class="meContainerAlpha">
            &nbsp;
        </div>
    </div>
  </li>
  <li class="me">
    <div class="meContainer">
        <div class="meContainerLink">
            <img="dummy.png">
        </div>
        <div class="meContainerAlpha">
            &nbsp;
        </div>
    </div>
  </li>
</ul>

I don't recall ever trying this method inside embedded <li> tags, so it may behave oddly at first. You may have to abandon <li> and switch to a different <div> structure entirely.

share|improve this answer
    
same as above. I need to keep the image visible and only add a shade of rgba(150,150,150,0.5) on top of the list item. –  frequent Aug 18 '11 at 11:34
    
@frequent: You'd be better off simply creating 2 images with the specified alpha settings in the png itself and simply swapping them using css. This will at least produce expected results in a cross-browser compatible method. The only other method I can think of would involve layering, but that's a whole lot of html and css to code for something this simple. –  Joel Etherton Aug 18 '11 at 11:36
    
@ Joel Etherthon: thanks, but I'm already swapping the img on hover, too. The whole thing is pretty complex (I just posted a basic example), so what do you mean by layering? Also - would a setup like this work: I add another element with li:before with display:hidden, make it the same dimension as the li, add the transparent layer and show this item only on hover? Question would be, if :before messes up the list structure, ala li, li, before, li... trying this now –  frequent Aug 18 '11 at 11:57
    
@frequent: I don't have enough experience with :before and :after to say. Everything I've read about it and tried so far indicate that it's not the proper solution because it'll just make the parent-child relationship goofy (particularly with respect to browser compatibility). I'll post an edit to describe the layering concept. –  Joel Etherton Aug 18 '11 at 12:03
    
Cool. Trying both :after/;before and your proposal. Might take a while, but I will let you know how it turns out –  frequent Aug 18 '11 at 12:17

Yes, the background is just a background, and is placed behind any child elements.

To achieve what you're looking for, try using the css :after pseudo element to mask the image on hover:

.me {
    position: relative;  
}

.me:hover:after {
    content: "";
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; left: 0;
    width: 100%; height: 100%;
    background: rgba(150,150,150,0.5);
}

It's shiny, you get to use the image as a semantic image, and requires no extra HTML markup.

share|improve this answer
    
the me:hover should only add a shade above the li (rgba, alpha 0.5), the span should be visible. I'm thinking of maybe doing something with :before or :after and displaying on hover. Would this work? –  frequent Aug 18 '11 at 11:33
    
@frequent - Absolutely. :after just creates another element that you can manipulate and position however you want. Without knowing more about your specific use case, you'll probably just need to adjust the sizing and positioning. –  derekerdmann Aug 18 '11 at 11:45
    
@derekdermann - I got it to work, except for IE7 (not supported). As the button was not clickable anymore with the element :before I tried something else. Still :before and :after are nice, as you can specify stuff IE7 won't see with :before and stuff IE8 won't see with ::before. Need to try this somewhere. –  frequent Aug 18 '11 at 14:20

another potential option that should be more cross browser than :after could be:

.me:hover span { display: hidden; }
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